Central Banks move to crypto in the effort to retain ...

Bitcoin Market

Bitcoin is the *currency of the Internet*. A distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Unlike traditional currencies such as dollars, bitcoins are issued and managed without the need for any central authority whatsoever.
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Bitcoin - The Internet of Money

/btc was created to foster and support free and open Bitcoin discussion about cryptocurrency, Bitcoin news, and exclusive AMA (Ask Me Anything) interviews from top Bitcoin and cryptocurrency leaders. Bitcoin is the currency of the Internet. A distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Unlike traditional currencies such as dollars, bitcoins are issued and managed without the need for any central authority whatsoever. Learn more about Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, cryptocurrency, and more.
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Bitcoin - The Currency of the Internet

A community dedicated to Bitcoin, the currency of the Internet. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no government, company, or bank in charge of Bitcoin. You might be interested in Bitcoin if you like cryptography, distributed peer-to-peer systems, or economics. A large percentage of Bitcoin enthusiasts are libertarians, though people of all political philosophies are welcome.
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Bitcoin Daily: SBI Backs Swiss Crypto Wallet; Saudi Arabia, UAE Central Banks Test New Crypto - pymnts.com

Bitcoin Daily: SBI Backs Swiss Crypto Wallet; Saudi Arabia, UAE Central Banks Test New Crypto - pymnts.com submitted by ulros to fbitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Daily: SBI Backs Swiss Crypto Wallet; Saudi Arabia, UAE Central Banks Test New Crypto - pymnts.com

Bitcoin Daily: SBI Backs Swiss Crypto Wallet; Saudi Arabia, UAE Central Banks Test New Crypto - pymnts.com submitted by prnewswireadmin to cryptonewswire [link] [comments]

Largest Bitcoin brokerage and wallet in the Philippines receives license from Central Bank

Largest Bitcoin brokerage and wallet in the Philippines receives license from Central Bank submitted by DigSomeMore to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bank/crypto secrecy is not a human right? "Central database with users' identities and wallet addresses, self-declaration forms... on a voluntary basis" - LOL /r/Bitcoin

Bank/crypto secrecy is not a human right? submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Largest Bitcoin brokerage and wallet in the Philippines receives license from Central Bank

Largest Bitcoin brokerage and wallet in the Philippines receives license from Central Bank submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

An interesting fiat gateway Lykke Wallet got. Claims to have a Lithuanian central bank's license while having only has 1 (one!), official employee. /r/Bitcoin

An interesting fiat gateway Lykke Wallet got. Claims to have a Lithuanian central bank's license while having only has 1 (one!), official employee. /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Paving Bitcoin's adoption

Paving Bitcoin's adoption submitted by simplelifestyle to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Fed says it is developing an experimental digital currency

Fed says it is developing an experimental digital currency submitted by readerseven to TechNewsToday [link] [comments]

Bitcoin: The Swiss Bank Account That Travels With You Everywhere

Bitcoin: The Swiss Bank Account That Travels With You Everywhere submitted by rnvk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Dear all central banks building centralised DLT CBDCs

Digital currencies built on centralised DLT databases are not transactable globally. You cannot send your centralised USD CBDC from a bank in the US to a bank in Singapore, there's no compatibility because your DLT database is closed and centralised.
Central bank digital currencies will still require SWIFT to transact them across borders. This is the literal equivalent of needing a post office to send your email for you.
Bitcoin is not revolutionary because it's digital, its revolutionary because its global and frictionless.
Think about it..
Yours Truly,
A kid who understands this stuff more than your entire DLT consultancy team.
submitted by slvbtc to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Raoul Pal shares his thoughts on the destructive consequences of CB printing, the rise of central bank digital currencies, the death of stablecoins & why he sees Bitcoin as the life raft of this critical juncture in history.

submitted by Milton_R to Economics [link] [comments]

the fed reserve wants to create fedcoin, you saw a glimpse of it in the first covid stimulus. what is stopping them from fully implementing it and how would it affect the adoption of bitcoin?

i want to invest a good percentage of my money in bitcoin to hedge against the collapse of the us dollar as the worlds reserve currency, but whats stopping the federal reserve from say:
ex: “today we are fully adopting the fedcoin. every citizen will have an account at the federal reserve and we will give you (insert fedcoin amount here) for every USD you have. all national debt will be erased/adjusted and we will be renewing the fedcoin as the worlds strongest reserve currency!”-mr. government
majority of people in the US would immediately adopt fedcoin without even thinking twice, whatever their government tells them to do, theyll do it. so wouldnt a stunt like this would really hurt bitcoin?
help me understand.
submitted by sendddit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Storing Bitcoin on Coinbase?

I am a beginner with Bitcoin looking to buy weekly and hold for several years. Is it okay to keep doing this on Coinbase Pro and Kraken? If I am not planning to directly spend my Bitcoin, why should I move it to a wallet?
submitted by Hopeful_Swim7961 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Putting $400M of Bitcoin on your company balance sheet

Also posted on my blog as usual. Read it there if you can, there are footnotes and inlined plots.
A couple of months ago, MicroStrategy (MSTR) had a spare $400M of cash which it decided to shift to Bitcoin (BTC).
Today we'll discuss in excrutiating detail why this is not a good idea.
When a company has a pile of spare money it doesn't know what to do with, it'll normally do buybacks or start paying dividends. That gives the money back to the shareholders, and from an economic perspective the money can get better invested in other more promising companies. If you have a huge pile of of cash, you probably should be doing other things than leave it in a bank account to gather dust.
However, this statement from MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor exists to make it clear he's buying into BTC for all the wrong reasons:
“This is not a speculation, nor is it a hedge. This was a deliberate corporate strategy to adopt a bitcoin standard.”
Let's unpack it and jump into the economics Bitcoin:

Is Bitcoin money?

No.
Or rather BTC doesn't act as money and there's no serious future path for BTC to become a form of money. Let's go back to basics. There are 3 main economic problems money solves:
1. Medium of Exchange. Before money we had to barter, which led to the double coincidence of wants problem. When everyone accepts the same money you can buy something from someone even if they don't like the stuff you own.
As a medium of exchange, BTC is not good. There are significant transaction fees and transaction waiting times built-in to BTC and these worsen the more popular BTC get.
You can test BTC's usefulness as a medium of exchange for yourself right now: try to order a pizza or to buy a random item with BTC. How many additional hurdles do you have to go through? How many fewer options do you have than if you used a regular currency? How much overhead (time, fees) is there?
2. Unit of Account. A unit of account is what you compare the value of objects against. We denominate BTC in terms of how many USD they're worth, so BTC is a unit of account presently. We can say it's because of lack of adoption, but really it's also because the market value of BTC is so volatile.
If I buy a $1000 table today or in 2017, it's roughly a $1000 table. We can't say that a 0.4BTC table was a 0.4BTC table in 2017. We'll expand on this in the next point:
3. Store of Value. When you create economic value, you don't want to be forced to use up the value you created right away.
For instance, if I fix your washing machine and you pay me in avocados, I'd be annoyed. I'd have to consume my payment before it becomes brown, squishy and disgusting. Avocado fruit is not good money because avocadoes loses value very fast.
On the other hand, well-run currencies like the USD, GBP, CAD, EUR, etc. all lose their value at a low and most importantly fairly predictible rate. Let's look at the chart of the USD against BTC
While the dollar loses value at a predictible rate, BTC is all over the place, which is bad.
One important use money is to write loan contracts. Loans are great. They let people spend now against their future potential earnings, so they can buy houses or start businesses without first saving up for a decade. Loans are good for the economy.
If you want to sign something that says "I owe you this much for that much time" then you need to be able to roughly predict the value of the debt in at the point in time where it's due.
Otherwise you'll have a hard time pricing the risk of the loan effectively. This means that you need to charge higher interests. The risk of making a loan in BTC needs to be priced into the interest of a BTC-denominated loan, which means much higher interest rates. High interests on loans are bad, because buying houses and starting businesses are good things.

BTC has a fixed supply, so these problems are built in

Some people think that going back to a standard where our money was denominated by a stock of gold (the Gold Standard) would solve economic problems. This is nonsense.
Having control over supply of your currency is a good thing, as long as it's well run.
See here
Remember that what is desirable is low variance in the value, not the value itself. When there are wild fluctuations in value, it's hard for money to do its job well.
Since the 1970s, the USD has been a fiat money with no intrinsic value. This means we control the supply of money.
Let's look at a classic poorly drawn econ101 graph
The market price for USD is where supply meets demand. The problem with a currency based on an item whose supply is fixed is that the price will necessarily fluctuate in response to changes in demand.
Imagine, if you will, that a pandemic strikes and that the demand for currency takes a sharp drop. The US imports less, people don't buy anything anymore, etc. If you can't print money, you get deflation, which is worsens everything. On the other hand, if you can make the money printers go brrrr you can stabilize the price
Having your currency be based on a fixed supply isn't just bad because in/deflation is hard to control.
It's also a national security risk...
The story of the guy who crashed gold prices in North Africa
In the 1200s, Mansa Munsa, the emperor of the Mali, was rich and a devout Muslim and wanted everyone to know it. So he embarked on a pilgrimage to make it rain all the way to Mecca.
He in fact made it rain so hard he increased the overall supply of gold and unintentionally crashed gold prices in Cairo by 20%, wreaking an economic havoc in North Africa that lasted a decade.
This story is fun, the larger point that having your inflation be at the mercy of foreign nations is an undesirable attribute in any currency. The US likes to call some countries currency manipulators, but this problem would be serious under a gold standard.

Currencies are based on trust

Since the USD is based on nothing except the US government's word, how can we trust USD not to be mismanaged?
The answer is that you can probably trust the fed until political stooges get put in place. Currently, the US's central bank managing the USD, the Federal Reserve (the Fed for friends & family), has administrative authority. The fed can say "no" to dumb requests from the president.
People who have no idea what the fed does like to chant "audit the fed", but the fed is already one of the best audited US federal entities. The transcripts of all their meetings are out in the open. As is their balance sheet, what they plan to do and why. If the US should audit anything it's the Department of Defense which operates without any accounting at all.
It's easy to see when a central bank will go rogue: it's when political yes-men are elected to the board.
For example, before printing themselves into hyperinflation, the Venezuelan president appointed a sociologist who publicly stated “Inflation does not exist in real life” and instead is a made up capitalist lie. Note what happened mere months after his gaining control over the Venezuelan currency
This is a key policy. One paper I really like, Sargent (1984) "The end of 4 big inflations" states:
The essential measures that ended hyperinflation in each of Germany,Austria, Hungary, and Poland were, first, the creation of an independentcentral bank that was legally committed to refuse the government'sdemand or additional unsecured credit and, second, a simultaneousalteration in the fiscal policy regime.
In english: *hyperinflation stops when the central bank can say "no" to the government."
The US Fed, like other well good central banks, is run by a bunch of nerds. When it prints money, even as aggressively as it has it does so for good reasons. You can see why they started printing on March 15th as the COVID lockdowns started:
The Federal Reserve is prepared to use its full range of tools to support the flow of credit to households and businesses and thereby promote its maximum employment and price stability goals.
In english: We're going to keep printing and lowering rates until jobs are back and inflation is under control. If we print until the sun is blotted out, we'll print in the shade.

BTC is not gold

Gold is a good asset for doomsday-preppers. If society crashes, gold will still have value.
How do we know that?
Gold has held value throughout multiple historic catastrophes over thousands of years. It had value before and after the Bronze Age Collapse, the Fall of the Western Roman Empire and Gengis Khan being Gengis Khan.
Even if you erased humanity and started over, the new humans would still find gold to be economically valuable. When Europeans d̶i̶s̶c̶o̶v̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ c̶o̶n̶q̶u̶e̶r̶e̶d̶ g̶e̶n̶o̶c̶i̶d̶e̶d̶ went to America, they found gold to be an important item over there too. This is about equivalent to finding humans on Alpha-Centauri and learning that they think gold is a good store of value as well.
Some people are puzzled at this: we don't even use gold for much! But it has great properties:
First, gold is hard to fake and impossible to manufacture. This makes it good to ascertain payment.
Second, gold doesnt react to oxygen, so it doesn't rust or tarnish. So it keeps value over time unlike most other materials.
Last, gold is pretty. This might sound frivolous, and you may not like it, but jewelry has actual value to humans.
It's no coincidence if you look at a list of the wealthiest families, a large number of them trade in luxury goods.
To paraphrase Veblen humans have a profound desire to signal social status, for the same reason peacocks have unwieldy tails. Gold is a great way to achieve that.
On the other hand, BTC lacks all these attributes. Its value is largely based on common perception of value. There are a few fundamental drivers of demand:
Apart from these, it's hard to argue that BTC will retain value throughout some sort of economic catastrophe.

BTC is really risky

One last statement from Michael Saylor I take offense to is this:
“We feel pretty confident that Bitcoin is less risky than holding cash, less risky than holding gold,” MicroStrategy CEO said in an interview
"BTC is less risky than holding cash or gold long term" is nonsense. We saw before that BTC is more volatile on face value, and that as long as the Fed isn't run by spider monkeys stacked in a trench coat, the inflation is likely to be within reasonable bounds.
But on top of this, BTC has Abrupt downside risks that normal currencies don't. Let's imagine a few:

Blockchain solutions are fundamentally inefficient

Blockchain was a genius idea. I still marvel at the initial white paper which is a great mix of economics and computer science.
That said, blockchain solutions make large tradeoffs in design because they assume almost no trust between parties. This leads to intentionally wasteful designs on a massive scale.
The main problem is that all transactions have to be validated by expensive computational operations and double checked by multiple parties. This means waste:
Many design problems can be mitigated by various improvements over BTC, but it remains that a simple database always works better than a blockchain if you can trust the parties to the transaction.
submitted by VodkaHaze to badeconomics [link] [comments]

Exchange VS Wallet

Can someone help me understand why a wallet app like Green is fundamentally more secure than an exchange app like Gemini?
Just to be clear I plan on storing all my Bitcoin on a Trezor hardware wallet, I’m just trying to get a deeper understanding of how transactions work between wallets, exchanges, etc, in order to protect myself.
Can you buy things with Bitcoin directly from an exchange app like Gemini?
Is it always secure to send and receive bitcoin from a wallet app like Green? If not what should I look out for in order not to get scammed. I’ve never bought anything with Bitcoin before and want to know exactly how before I try.
submitted by Xanaxtastrophy to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

How to invest in bitcoin?

I know I probably sound stupid but I’ve been thinking about it for a while now, and I’m really interested in buying a few of them, how would I go about doing so? I looked online and all the websites seem very sketchy I was hoping maybe some of the experts here could help me out, thanks
submitted by ianwillis18 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Crypto Exchange Wallet Address different from the one on Blockchain.com?

So, I decided to invest in Bitcoin and I was able to buy a fraction of one from a trusted exchange. The funds have been deposited in my exchange wallet and when I tried to spot the transaction on the blockchain.com explorer, I was able to find my wallet address (which was given to me by the exchange) but there were no transactions despite the fact that they're present in my wallet on the exchange's app and website. Could someone please explain why this is happening?
submitted by bluesy0310 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Newbie with investing, massively overthinking and analysing wallets! Please help :)

Hey guys,
i have been umming and uhhing for some time about btc and have come to the point where I am confident in what it stands for and it’s future.
The last few days I have been reading endlessly about which wallets to use and have decided that I will wait to get a cold wallet and focus on a hot wallet to store my monthly investments. I’m using an IOS And based in the UK so would really love a suggestion in which would be best for my situation? I’ve looked at BRD, Green, Edge & Coinomi- slight leaning preference to Coinomi. Also which exchange is best? I’ve heard mixed reviews on Coinbase and would choose Kraken but unfortunately do not have an updated passport. Any help would be amazing, thanks in advance 😊
submitted by Meowth101 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Best place to buy bitcoin in the UK

I've signed up to coinbase but ive seen some comments saying that coinbase is not very good but no reason along with it
Can anyone clarify whether coinbase is good and if not what alternatives can we use
submitted by PlackOfCigarettes to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What the Department of Justices Recent Obession with Cryptography and Crypto is About

I often post things here that really come across as fud, but what we have seen these last couple months is an explosion in regulator activity. The way the US federal government works, is it sits on cases for years at a time in secrecy, and then it attacks.
There are many obscure laws that people are all unaware of which entirely relate to the war on terror and 9/11 and the Patriot Act. The truth is that most of these banking laws that changed are a result of their pretense to behave like a police state under the guise of fighting terrorism. Well What does that have to do with bitcoin?

They want to set the precedence of those anti terrorism laws and banking laws onto end to end encryption and bitcoin. These people have a clear motive they are trying to keep hid, that crypto lawyer are beginning to speculate isn't off the table. They certainly implied in the DoJ 83 page report that those options are on the table. But the truth is, they *already* want to do it anyways.
Before I make the case for what I am alleging you need to know about the key regulatory bodies and some of these laws, which I'm just gonna list for you to research in case you doubt me:
1) OFAC 2)FATF 3)BIS 4)Interpol 5)Banking Secrecy Act 6)Treasury Department 7)Federal Reserve
Namely, What can the US do under OFAC in the guise of anti terrorism. Well the short answer is ANYTHING. And that is what this 83 page guide by Barr is claiming, that is what the Bitmex Indictment by the Department of Justice is claiming, that is what they have been doing in Afghanistan and Iraq for 20 years. It's been like this since 9/11 and now they are squaring in on crypto.
It is clear that the Department of Justice and AG Barr do not want Bitcoin to function as Bitcoin, much like end to end encryption they want a back door
But let's talk about what that looks like.
1) Forcing every country in the world to enforce mandatory KYC on all decentralized smart contracts and all centralized exchanges with the threat of extrajudicial indictment and OFAC black listing for Banking Secrecy Act violations and Terrorism funding.
2) Forcing every country to prohibit withdrawls to any non preregistered white listed address that has been vetted by CipherTrace and Chain Analysis with the threat as stated in 1)
3) Forcing every country to prohibit US customers from making an account without extremely profoundly high regulatory costs, thus trapping capital in the united states and prohibiting US citizen from investing overseas, as most modern Banks today will no longer take Americans as customers overseas, due to the same regulatory threats.
4) Forcing every merchant in America, and as many outside of America to use Chain Analysis and Cipher Trace on all transactions to vet the source of the funds, and if those funds do not have a chain of custody on a public blockchain linking back to a white listed kyced account, then rejecting those transactions (no more monero)
5) Forcing every exchange in the world to do the same chain of custody verification on every customer just as above.
6) Disallowing any deposits in a US financial exchange to cash out without said chain of custody.
7) Disallowing any cash out of funds that have not been declared as owned assets in a perpetually pervasively monitored public address that the US regulatory bodies know about.
8) The constant threat of censorship and forced confiscation.
9) The backdooring of all hardware wallets and software wallets, prosecution of developers. Indictments against Trezor and Ledgernano.
10) Perpetual Surveilance

Will You Fight? Or Will You Perish Like A Dog?

What are you going to do about it?

submitted by samdane7777 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The greatest wealth transfer of this century! An analysis: British-US-Chinese Empires: Gold, Silver, Bitcoin, Ethereum!

"Inflation makes you pay 50 dollars for the 20 dollar haircut you used to get for 5 dollars when you had hair!"
Let's embark on a journey that made the United States the number 1 economy of the world.

1. Despite the British Empire's claim that it would for ever remain the leading empire,history can serve as a harbinger for what's to come...

At the peak of its power, in 1913, "the empire on which the sun never sets", controlled 25% of the planet's land mass and about the same percentage of the world's population. Britain was both the naval an imperial power of the 19th century, and between 1812-1914, its dominance resulted in relative peace in Europe and the rest of the world. The industrial revolution transformed Britain into the workshop of the world.
By the start of the 20th century things changed as both Germany and the United States started to challenge Britain's economic and influential leadership. As often happened during human history such challenging lead to war and although Britain achieved its largest territorial influence after WW1, the war had destroyed much of its economic strength, with losses in industrial and military power marking the begin of its demise.
During WW2, Japan occupied Britain's colonies, and after WW2, India, Britain's most valuable and populous possession, achieved independence. Much of the British Empire's influence is now enshrined in the Commonwealth Charter, stating shared values like democracy, human rights and the rule of law.
The United Kingdom's pound sterling was its world's reserve currency during its reign and by controlling the supply of money, Britain was able to influence its global power.
"Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation, and I care not who makes its laws!" Mayer Amschel Rothschild

2. The US Empire repeats this blueprint by claiming the U.S. Dollar's reserve currency status as its birthright!

The Federal Reserve Act.
The Panic of 1907 triggered many American's belief that The Federal Reserve Act, passed by the 63rd United States Congress and signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson on December 23, 1913, was necessary for financial and economic stability. The law created the Federal Reserve System, the central banking system of the United States.
The Bretton Woods System.
The FED ended immobile reserve issues and the inelastic currency problems and successfully internationalized the U.S Dollar as the global reserve currency. The usage of the prior nationally used U.S. Dollar expanded a first time when the Allies agreed to the terms of the Bretton Woods System, establishing the rules for commercial as well as financial regulations among the United States and its allies. Canada, Western Europe, Australia and Japan accepted the U.S. Dollar, which was backed by a gold exchange standard, making the U.S. Dollar "as good as gold". This was only possible because the United States controlled two thirds of the world's gold reserves.
Soviet representatives, who claimed that institutions like the IMF and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) were Wall Street branches, didn't participate in Bretton Woods and later proved to be right, as the United States printed too much money (not backed by its gold reserves) to wage war on Vietnam, destroying a big part of the value of the U.S. Dollars held by its allies, due to the inflation of the U.S. Dollar money supply.
Yet, the initial demand for U.S. dollars created the American way of life: a consumer driven economy fueled by products made outside the U.S. in return for U.S. Dollars. As the Allied countries couldn't really buy any "Made in America"-products, due to the fact that the United States' elites rather outsourced their manufacturing, they instead invested their hard labor into U.S. Treasuries.
On August 1971, President Richard Nixon announced the unilateral cancellation of the direct international convertibility of the United States dollar to gold, in a response to halt the Allied countries' continuous attempts to exchange their U.S. Dollars for Gold. By 1973, the Bretton Woods system was replaced by the current freely floating fiat currency system.
The petro dollar system.
The second wave of U.S. Dollar adoption was the result of the petro dollar, making the global trade of oil U.S. Dollar denominated. Every country on this planet needed and still needs oil to operate and grow its economy, creating an enormous growth in U.S. Dollar demand and like mentioned before, those dollars had to be earned. Especially China served the United States consumer model by producing almost everything Americans can buy in Wall Mart and other stores. By relying on the U.S. Dollar reserve currency status, the American elites have made the mistake of outsourcing manufacturing to China, as often predicted by Donald Trump in the 1980's. The y figured it was easier to just print wealth.
The tradewar.
President Donald Trump, decided it was time to bring jobs back to the U.S. and started an ongoing trade war with China, the country that supplied the U.S. consumer driven economy, and proud owner of $1.07 trillion in Treasury holdings. The trade war has negatively impacted the economies of both the United States and China and will most likely result in the decoupling of both economies.
What is to come? My personal insights.
I see huge problems for the U.S. and the rest of the western liberal democracies. But especially the United States, who's currency amounts to no less than 60% of all the world's reserve assets, is vulnerable if and when China who only accounts for 1 or 2 %, says it is time for change. Most likely we will experience another banking crisis, with or without Covid-19, and unfortunately a bigger one when compared to the 2008 dissaster. Did you know that the global debt tripled since then? Many economists and politicians advocate the end of the U.S. Dollar reserve currency system and predict a reset. Every financial system has a limited lifespan similar to a human live: it is created, it grows, it matures, and unfortunately, it ages, weakens and dies. It happened to the Brittish Pound Sterling, and I am afraid that the days of this financial hegemony are numbered as well.
And I did write "afraid", why?
History tells us that these transition periods are particularly dangerous and have often led to full-blown military conflicts if not world wars. The current wealth transfer, the result of manufacturing outsourcing to mainland China, impoverished the United States and destroyed its middle class. President Donald Trump's analysis that the U.S. needs a strong manufacturing base is correct, yet without its allies the United States will not be able to turn the tide.
It took China decades to build its manufacturing base, and President Trump doesn't have the privilege of having the political luxury to design five year plans, as the United States capitalistic and political model specializes more on presidential campaigning and less on economic planning, which is exactly China's strength.

3. The Chinese 'digital' empire.

China is ideally positioned to become the new global power: it produces many of our products and dominates most supply chains. It has been hoarding gold and mines most of the Bitcoin. It might just have the right reserve assets to back its DCEP, the digital Yuan, which will be pilot tested during the 2022 Winter Olympics hosted by China. Despite the fact that the United States and other western nations might not want to adopt the Yuan or allow it to be part of the world's reserve assets, China can demand payment in Yuan for its products. It's that simple! This is why outsourcing is such as stupid economic voluntarily yet fatal policy. If you only print money and don't produce goods, how long will the world play ball?
One of the results of Trump's trade war is that China and other countries such as Russia and Iran no longer want to be vulnerable to U.S. sanctions that come in the shape of being denied access to the financial system through Swift. The United States can indeed destroy a big part of Iran's economy, but Iran is now becoming a big cryptocurrency player. In other words, bullying those countries might work in the short-term, but in the long-term they will simply adopt a new standard: and I believe that the Yuan will likely play a major role in the financial system they will adopt.
This trend means that the expansion of the demand in U.S. Dollars will stop and reverse, when countries no longer want to use the currency whose issuer can economically destroy them through sanctions. The alternatives for such countires are cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum and many others, national CBDC's (Central Bank Digital Currencies), and the adoption of the digital Yuan.
This digital Yuan will be attached to the One Belt, One road initiative, finding adoption whilst developing huge infrastructure projects that will lead to a Eurasian trading zone. If the U.S. Military leaves the Middle East, as Trump brings home troops, this will create the right conditions for China to emerge as the victor.

4. Surveillance Capitalism - Insights on the DCEP (Digital Currency Electronic Payment, DC/EP):

  1. This centralized digital financial system works on blockchain and cryptographic principles and aims to increase the circulation of the RMB, in the hope it can become a reserve currency like the U.S. Dollar.
  2. Created and sanctioned by the Chinese Government, it is the only legal digital currency in China.
  3. The system offers Chinese regulators better monitoring abilities and will be an efficient tool against anonymous counterfeiting, money laundering and illegal financing. At the same time it reduces costs involved in maintaining and recycling bank notes and coins.
  4. As mentioned above, China aims to bypass Swift, which it regards to be a U.S. entity, and will be able to collect real-time data related to money creation, bookkeeping, essential information for the implementation of monetary policies.
  5. The pilot institutions for DCEP, China Construction Bank, Agricultural Bank of China, Bank of China and Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, will serve as a production test for China's new currency system, after which the DCEP will be distributed to large fintech companies such as Tencent and Alibaba to be used in WeChat Pay and AliPay. Transfers will not go through bank accounts, but through electronic wallets.
  6. By mandating that all merchants who accept digital payments must accept DCEP, the DECP will become the most accepted digital currency in the world.

5. Sings of hope.

If the United States adopts blockchain and issues a CBDC (Central Bank Digital Currency) backed by Bitcoin, they will have a reasonable chance to offer the western democracies a new type of dollar standard that can be an anchor versus the coming RMB. If not, I fear the worst is yet to come for the U.S. Dollar and its economy.
Many smart American economists and Wall Street goeroe's have finally figured out the remarkable strength of Bitcoin, the world's first and most favorite digital form of gold.
Some of the smartest investment capitalists like Ray Dalio and Warren Buffet have allocated more money into gold, a clear sign of trouble. Bitcoin might be a step too far for Warren Buffet, but rest assure that Wall Street investment management companies have figured it out by now, have you?
You can expect more institutions to allocate a % of their portfolio's wealth into Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, as a hedge against the systemic risk in our global financial system, which will inevitable start feeling the effects of the trillions that have been printed.
"Inflation makes you pay 50 dollars for the 20 dollar haircut you used to get for 5 dollars when you had hair!"
submitted by O_My_Crypto to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

If you found out that ABC was trying to intentionally derail Bitcoin Cash would you continue using their client? Their actions have pushed for centralization along with actively destroying utility. Please stop using ABC.

I need to spell this out for new users here.
Bitcoin Cash has been and continues to be the original immutable Bitcoin ledger since it was launched in 2008. In 2017 Bitcoin got an upgrade with larger blocks and the Bitcoin described in the Whitepaper is now called Bitcoin Cash. Bitcoin Cash continues to be peer-to-peer electronic cash. It doesn't require a business, government middleman, 2nd-layer hub-spoke junk model or centralized development team to continue and flourish. That's what makes Bitcoin Cash so powerful. It gives you back control of the money you rightfully earn and save.
Bitcoin Cash scales and it can do so cheaply for even small transaction amounts. The world can start using Bitcoin Cash today and it will scale elegantly where other centralized and intentionally crippled coins like BitcoinBTC will fail.
The above facts make Bcore fanboys shivver in their timbers. That's why they're here attacking this project. Bitcoin Core is garbage software and Bitcoin Core fan boys were dumb enough to buy into a pump-and-dump scheme rather than actual coin utility.
More facts:
To make it crystal clear, Bitcoin Cash is and will continue to be under social attack in this subreddit. Don't be surprised to see trolls troll'in. They are here and they mean to destroy this project despite it being a benefit to them in their actual lives, since they too use Money.
In regards to ABC:
The recent IFP miner tax theft attempt was an attack on decentralization of the Bitcoin Cash protocol. We got lucky... very lucky.
ABC's more recent DAA Grasberg change would slow blocks, making Bitcoin Cash less useful, while also invalidating time contracts built on top of it. It's another clear attack on the utility of Bitcoin Cash.
It's obvious that ABC is making changes that will undermine Bitcoin Cash. Maybe it's a government actor that is forcing these harmful changes. Not sure, and there's no way to know, but it's clear that these are incredibly harmful changes that would only be pushed by someone trying to do serious harm.
Please use BCHN, Bitcoin Unlimited or one of the other great wallets. These projects have BETTER developers than ABC and they don't appear to be actively trying to undermine it.
Power to the people.
submitted by Annapurna317 to btc [link] [comments]

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Central Banks first ignored the digital money phenomena; then they turned skeptical; further, they became aggressive. Finally, they realized that the reality was quickly evolving decided to join ... One of China's biggest banks recently opened up registration for wallets using the country's central bank-backed digital currency. There are four levels of the wallet, according to reports. Five Russian banks have already expressed interest in participating in the central bank digital currency (CBDC) pilot: Credit Bank of Moscow, Promsvyazbank, Bank Zenit, Dom.RF, and Russian ... Why Central Banks Want to Create Their Own Digital Currencies Like Bitcoin A guide to what digital currencies issued by central banks could mean for users, banks and the economy The central banks of Britain, the euro zone, Japan, Sweden, Canada and Switzerland will make up the new group, which will assess economic, functional, and technical design choices, as well as cross-border interoperability. The US Federal Reserve was absent from the recent discussions and we can’t say we’re surprised considering the country’s unstable political landscape at the moment ...

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Central Bank to Hoard Bitcoin and Wall Street in BIG Trouble!

Central bank announces Bitcoin intentions and Wall Street is in big trouble as the repo crisis unfolds, long term bitcoin price trend still looks awesome! FR... Share your videos with friends, family, and the world #bitcoin #crypto #cryptocurrencies Looking to buy crypto and earn interest? 📈 ️ https://digifox.finance Check out BlockDown2020: https://blockdownconf.com/ 💹... Open A Coinbase Account To Buy Bitcoin Or XRP https://bit.ly/2YHw67a #paid #promotion The above links are either affiliate links or paid discount promotions and deals. He lays out for us what he feels is the Bitcoin road map indirectly being put in place by the governments and central banks. There backs are against the wall with the everything bubble and the ...

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