Installing bitcoin on Debian 'squeeze' - Bealers.com

Delightful Privacy

Delightful Privacy delightful

This is a collection of software, operating systems, and other miscellaneous tools to help the average user fight for their privacy and security online.

Operating Systems

Fedora

Fedora uses Security-Enhanced Linux by default, which implements a variety of security policies, including mandatory access controls, which Fedora adopted early on. Fedora provides a hardening wrapper, and does hardening for all of its packages by using compiler features such as position-independent executable (PIE). Wikipedia

Pop!_OS

Pop!_OS provides full out-of-the-box support for both AMD and Nvidia GPUs. It is regarded as an easy distribution to set-up for gaming, mainly due to its built-in GPU support. Pop!_OS provides default disk encryption, streamlined window and workspace management, keyboard shortcuts for navigation as well as built in power management profiles. The latest releases also have packages that allow for easy setup for TensorFlow and CUDA. Wikipedia

Debian

Debian is one of the oldest operating systems based on the Linux kernel. The project is coordinated over the Internet by a team of volunteers guided by the Debian Project Leader and three foundational documents: the Debian Social Contract, the Debian Constitution, and the Debian Free Software Guidelines. New distributions are updated continually, and the next candidate is released after a time-based freeze. Wikipedia

openSUSE Tumbleweed - Rolling Release!

Any user who wishes to have the newest packages that include, but are not limited to, the Linux Kernel, SAMBA, git, desktops, office applications and many other packages, will want Tumbleweed. openSUSE

For enhanced security

Qubes OS

Qubes OS is a security-focused desktop operating system that aims to provide security through isolation. Virtualization is performed by Xen, and user environments can be based on Fedora, Debian, Whonix, and Microsoft Windows, among other operating systems. Wikipedia

Tails

Tails, or The Amnesic Incognito Live System, is a security-focused Debian-based Linux distribution aimed at preserving privacy and anonymity. All its incoming and outgoing connections are forced to go through Tor, and any non-anonymous connections are blocked. Wikipedia).*

Whonix

Whonix is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet. The operating system consists of two virtual machines, a "Workstation" and a Tor "Gateway", running Debian GNU/Linux. All communications are forced through the Tor network to accomplish this. Wikipedia

Web Browsers

For Desktop

Firefox Needs manual tweaking to be more secure! Use ghacks

Firefox, is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation and its subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. Wikipedia Recommended addons: uBlock Origin | Https Everywhere | Privacy Badger | Privacy Possum | Decentraleyes | NoScript | CanvasBlocker

Tor

Tor is free and open-source software for enabling anonymous communication. The name derived from the acronym for the original software project name "The Onion Router". Tor directs Internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer overlay network consisting of more than seven thousand relays to conceal a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. Using Tor makes it more difficult to trace Internet activity to the user. Wikipedia

UnGoogled-Chromium

Without signing in to a Google Account, Chromium does pretty well in terms of security and privacy. However, Chromium still has some dependency on Google web services and binaries. In addition, Google designed Chromium to be easy and intuitive for users, which means they compromise on transparency and control of internal operations.
ungoogled-chromium addresses these issues in the following ways:

For mobile

Bromite Android Only

Bromite is a Chromium fork with ad blocking and privacy enhancements; take back your browser! Bromite

Firefox Focus Android - iOS

Firefox Focus is a free and open-source privacy-focused browser from Mozilla, available for Android and iOS. Wikipedia

Tor Browser for mobile Android - iOS

Tor protects your privacy on the internet by hiding the connection between your Internet address and the services you use. We believe Tor is reasonably secure, but please ensure you read the instructions and configure it properly. GitHub

Email

Tutanota

Tutanota is an end-to-end encrypted email software and freemium hosted secure email service. Wikipedia

Mailbox

There are many ears listening on the Internet, which is why all our services require mandatory SSL/TLS-encrypted data transmission. For additional security, we also use enhanced (green) security certificates ("EV") by the independent SwissSign trust service provider from Switzerland (Check the padlock symbol in your web browser's URL field). But this is just the beginning – there is so much more that we do. Mailbox

Disroot

Disroot is a decentralized cloud-based service that allows you to store your files and communicate with one another. Established by a privacy-focused organization of volunteers, if we look at Disroot as an email provider specifically, it stands out thanks to its emphasis on security with a completly free open-source approach. ProPrivacy

ProtonMail

ProtonMail is an end-to-end encrypted email service founded in 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland by scientists who met at the CERN research facility. ProtonMail uses client-side encryption to protect email content and user data before they are sent to ProtonMail servers, unlike other common email providers such as Gmail and Outlook.com. The service can be accessed through a webmail client, the Tor network, or dedicated iOS and Android apps. Wikipedia

Search Engine

Searx

searx is a free metasearch engine, available under the GNU Affero General Public License version 3, with the aim of protecting the privacy of its users. To this end, searx does not share users' IP addresses or search history with the search engines from which it gathers results. Tracking cookies served by the search engines are blocked, preventing user-profiling-based results modification. By default, searx queries are submitted via HTTP POST, to prevent users' query keywords from appearing in webserver logs. Wikipedia - Find public instances of searx here searx.space

Startpage

Startpage is a web search engine that highlights privacy as its distinguishing feature. Previously, it was known as the metasearch engine Ixquick, At that time, Startpage was a variant service. Both sites were merged in 2016. Wikipedia

YaCy

YaCy is a free distributed search engine, built on principles of peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Its core is a computer program written in Java distributed on several hundred computers, as of September 2006, so-called YaCy-peers. Each YaCy-peer independently crawls through the Internet, analyzes and indexes found web pages, and stores indexing results in a common database (so called index) which is shared with other YaCy-peers using principles of P2P networks. It is a free search engine that everyone can use to build a search portal for their intranet and to help search the public internet clearly. Wikipedia

VPN

If you need anonymity and privacy online use Tor instead, if you are looking to bypass a geo-restriction, don't trust public WiFi, or are looking to Torrent, a VPN will help you.

Mullvad

Mullvad is an open-source commercial virtual private network (VPN) service based in Sweden. Launched in March 2009, Mullvad operates using the WireGuard and OpenVPN protocols. Mullvad accepts Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash for subscriptions in addition to conventional payment methods.
No email address or other identifying information is requested during Mullvad's registration process. Rather, a unique 16-digit account number is anonymously generated for each new user. This account number is henceforth used to log in to the Mullvad service.
The TechRadar review notes that "The end result of all this is you don't have to worry about how Mullvad handles court requests to access your usage data, because, well, there isn't any." Wikipedia

ProtonVPN

ProtonVPN utilizes OpenVPN (UDP/TCP) and the IKEv2 protocol, with AES-256 encryption. The company has a strict no-logging policy for user connection data, and also prevents DNS and Web-RTC leaks from exposing users' true IP addresses. ProtonVPN also includes Tor access support and a kill switch to shut off Internet access in the event of a lost VPN connection.
In January 2020, ProtonVPN became the first VPN provider to release its source code on all platforms and conduct an independent security audit. ProtonVPN is the only VPN to do so, even though experts say this is a crucial factor in deciding whether to trust a VPN service. Wikipedia

For information about alternatives to software and services.

If you are looking for alternatives to proprietary services like Discord and Facebook, or an open-source alternative to Photoshop, check out our list about Awesome-Alternatives

Mirrors are kept up to date, this post may lag behind as we add stuff in.

submitted by CipherOps to LinuxCafe [link] [comments]

⟳ 870 apps added, 78 updated at f-droid.org

Notice: this update is spurious, and the issue is being looked at.
⟳ f-droid.org from Wed, 26 Feb 2020 20:21:50 GMT updated on Sun, 01 Mar 2020 05:23:29 GMT contains 2962 apps.
Added (870)
Updated (78)
2020-03-01T05:53:18Z
submitted by BrainstormBot to FDroidUpdates [link] [comments]

[IDEA] [PROPOSAL] Monero Debian (deb) packages / Debian package repository deb.getmonero.org (I can do)

I have the skills to implement this if wanted.
Possible User Experience
This is a proposal, i.e. not implemented yet. Instructions for users, simplified.
How to install monero using apt-get
Download the repository signing key.
wget https://www.getmonero.org/monero.asc
Add the signing key.
sudo apt-key --keyring /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/monero.gpg add ~/monero.asc
Add APT repository.
echo "deb https://deb.getmonero.org buster main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/monero.list
Update your package lists.
sudo apt-get update
Install monero.
sudo apt-get install monero
A few technical implementation details
I would simply grab the binaries provided by getmonero.org, download them, check software (gpg) signatures, put these into deb packages, add these to a repository, and upload the repository.
What I would not do is creating the binaries during package creation. While this is nice to have, it doesn't help user experience and blocks the progress on reaching this goal. See next chapter.
Why simply put the pre-build Monero binaries into a deb package?
1) After bitcoin existing for more than 10 years, being popular and being in Debian unstable (sid) it still never made its way into Debian testing, let alone stable. Reason being explained that a difference in underlying libraries (even just security fixes) during compilation may result in a network split. Binaries compiled during packaging on different versions of Linux distributions might have different libraries that might cause a network fork / chain split.
References:
(Note: above website saying Tags: fixed-upstream is probably a mistake as discussion at bottom says.)
2) The github issue of packaging monero stalled.
3) By shipping the same binaries as provided by getmonero.org reduces the chances of introducing a backdoor.
Many Options
Timeline
Doable quickly. The electrum (bitcoin) AppImage was recently added to a Debian package (binaries-freedom) by me and is now easily installable in Whonix. Pre-installed in testers version of Whonix already.
About Me
I am the founder of Whonix, which I am maintaining at present for more than 7 years.
Whonix (formerly TorBOX) is a Debian GNU/Linux–based security-focused Linux distribution. It aims to provide privacy, security and anonymity on the internet.
You can see an overview of packages I am maintaining on my github profile.
To proof that this forum account adrelanos corresponds the same person maintaining whonix.org, it is added here.
Questions
What happened to, what is the successor of the forum funding system?
submitted by adrelanos to Monero [link] [comments]

Huge performance difference doing the blockchain sync in bitcoin core 0.17.1 vs. snap bitcoin core 0.17.0.1

Hi, I recently installed a fresh Ubuntu 18.04 and, as it was already late and I wanted to sync the blockchain overnight, quickly searched for bitcoind in the graphical package manager and to my delight there was a package 0.17.0.1 that I misread for 0.17.1, so I installed it not looking further into it and started the sync. The software immediately hogged >90% CPU usage, the fans started to run at full speed, the laptop ran hot as hell and the sync lasted like 14 hours. Next day when the sync was done I realized the f***** graphical install tool had installed a so called snap package, what's the newest craziness in Ubuntu to drive users away to other distros. Then I found out that the package is maintained by a guy who is completely unrelated to bitcoin core and a known shitcoiner, someone who can't be trusted. The guy didn't even realize he was confusing 0.17.0.1 with 0.17.1, wtf. See here for more info: https://bugs.launchpad.net/snapstore/+bug/1803914
Of course I immediately wiped the whole crap off of my installation, luckily before restoring any wallet balances. I also wiped the complete snap system, whoever came up with this shit should be tared and feathered and then be forced to use MS Windows for the rest of their life.
Afterwards I installed 0.17.1 from https://bitcoincore.org/en/download/ and properly verified my download before starting the blockchain sync.
There was a *huge* difference in performance, no noticeable CPU usage, no fans spinning up, and the whole sync process took maybe 4 hours, so a whopping third than the bogus snap version needed. I looked into the release notes, there is some mentioning of performance enhancements, but nothing about a reduction of sync time by two thirds.
So here comes my question, anybody knows more about this dubious Ubuntu snap package? Why is there such a performance difference, is this thing a genuine bitcoind at all or has someone tampered with that thing?
At least this should also be a warning to Ubuntu users, disable that snap crap and use apt to install software, and install critical stuff like bitcoin per hand from the official download page. And better use Debian and ditch Ubuntu like I will do as soon as I find time for it.
submitted by kbdwarrior to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

A response to the GRS Shill cries

First of all, I think it is right to say that it wouldn’t be fair for the recent reddit to be entirely attributed to the recent 130% rise in GRS price – The price has gone a lot higher when SegWit was activated and a lot higher in the runup to the previous release announcement (22nd September) and was arguably at the ‘floor’ when it was discovered by us.
I’d like to give a little bit of a backstory on the recent discovery of GRS by a small group of people in a hope you realise this isn’t just shilling some shit-coin for a pump and dump. It was never our intention to come across as shilling and certainly not our intention to attract ‘pump and dump’ groups. We merely searched for SegWit-activated coins, and the main one that kept popping up was Groestlcoin, in posts that didn’t even mention Litecoin or Vertcoin. We thought that it was worth investigating further and decided to do some more research, and the more we found we more we realised that this was a genuine diamond amongst the rocks. 254th in market cap, first to activate SegWit, Lightning Network in full development, the list was endless – and seemingly nobody knew about it which was insanity.
In several places we saw that no marketing was done or being actively planned, and it was up to the community to market the coin if they wanted to whilst the 20+ developers keep cracking on to try and be the first to more developments.
We contacted the lead developer, ‘Jackielove4u’ and started a plan to try and market the coin, first by creating a Discord channel for discussions and then by trying to get their great features out to the world and aim for slow-and-steady growth.
In hindsight, a bit more finesse would have been better and the reddit posts got a little out-of-hand, if I didn’t know any better I would have seen GRS as a coin being shilled too on Reddit, and I have accused people of doing the same with Vertcoin in the past. So I thought I’d try to clear up some misconceptions and give one targeted response post to the cries of shilling and try to give the facts to the best of my knowledge, whilst trying to give an unbias opinion as much as I can based on my views and the views of the response that we’ve had.
PROS:
• Segwit Enabled Enabled first)
• Low-Power Mining – This is a selling point but people have said the power consumption is on-par with Vertcoin. I think the mining uses 2 rounds of Groestl algorithm hashing to make it more secure but is still very low on power consumption and hardware wear
• Lightning Network currently in development
• They have had an easy miner solution since 2015 – Although I’d be the first to admit it is a little clunky, but is openly on Git for improvements.
• 3 iOS wallets (Including a shared wallet), 11 android wallets (1x Secure BIP147, 1x Including sending GRS via SMS, 1x ability to use NFC tags as encryption keys), 11 blackberry wallets (Secure), 3 web wallets and 10 desktop wallets with varying features / designs – More to come on the differences soon.
• Over 80 electrum servers
• Working testnet
• Hosts their own block explorer
• Officially maintained by the Bitcoin Debian packaging team
• Ubuntu PPA available
• ASIC resistant, profitable CPU and GPU mining (And has an ARM miner apparently!) We’re just brushing the surface of the great tech that is being developed by the GRS developers.
CONS:
• Elephant in the room – The name. People have called it ugly, most don’t know how to pronounce it (It’s Groosel-coin). The developers are open to a rebrand pending a community vote in 2018.
• I’ve heard a few times ‘that logo looks like a cross between google and wordpress’. Again the logo is open to rebrand/redesign pending a vote (open for suggestions/examples!) but there is some significance in it. The ‘2’ in the logo is for the 2 rounds of Groestl algorithm hashing that is used.
• Obviously little or no marketing up until this point. Marketing is important (if not vital) for the success of a coin so we’re trying to spread some awareness.
• Lots of internet posts saying that it is a scam coin. From what I can see it seems to be because the coin has been ‘pumped-and-dumped’ a few times? By that logic, most coins are scam coins? The block reward dropped 6% a week when it was first launched specifically to prevent pump-and-dumps.
• Rumours of a pre-mine of 0.2% (240,000 coins) when it was first created. I haven’t gotten to the bottom of this to confirm or deny, but if it was true it seems to have been given as rewards for some early marketing (where those odd naked women pictures come from) and some early bounty rewards to get the ball rolling. No pre-mine is ideal but its personally something I can look over now if it IS true.
• Over 70% of the mined coins are owned by the top 100 addresses. Again, this is clearly an issue that many other coins also are facing (albeit some to a lesser extent). I can only guess that the more time that passes being a lesser-known coin, the greater risk that this becomes as the same miners mine for a longer period of time. Not sure if this matters much but it’s also worth noting that 24% of the mined coins appear to be on Bittrex currently.
TL:DR – Trying not to shill GRS, just trying to get the word out. Criticisms about the coin have been noted by the developers and they are very open to change and improvements suggested if they are the popular vote. I recommend that you research more into the coin, coin the discord on https://discord.gg/8VURndr and make a decision based on your own research whether you'd see something in, and like to support the coin.
Apologies for such a long post..
submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

Electrum will be in the next Ubuntu release in ~1 month. Please help test it now.

Hello, I am magicfab posting from the Bitcoin Embassy account.
Yesterday I shared here why I thought it was excellent news that Electrum was recently made available to all Debian GNU/Linux users and its derivatives and how it was so recent that it had missed the time window to be included automatically in one of its derivatives, Ubuntu.
I filed a bug report to make an exception and include electrum in Ubuntu now instead of waiting another 6 months, and it was quickly accepted. The package is already available for testing. Don't download it directly! If you're using Ubuntu 13.10 already you can search for electrum with your package manager or just sudo apt-get install electrum.
This is the ideal time to install Ubuntu 13.10 and test its functionality and this includes Electrum. Ubuntu "Saucy Salamander" is still in beta, and beta freeze is today. For all intents and purposes, the beta version is very close to what will be released in ~1 month, stable enough to use daily, and specially to test and file important bugs reports. If you find a bug in Ubuntu for Electrum or Debian, this is an excellent time to report it.
As the Chief Ambassador here at the Bitcoin Embassy, this is one of the more technical aspects in my role of Bitcoin advocacy that I believe is important to help with. If anyone files a bug report, has similar ideas or other technical requests regarding use of Bitcoin with free open source software / operating systems, PM me at magicfab or Bitcoin_Embassy.
tl;dr: Electrum will be in the final Ubuntu 13.10 release :) PM me if you have technical suggestions/requests related to Bitcoin + free software.
submitted by Bitcoin_Embassy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Reupload][Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

note: I had to reupload this because reddit is banning my original account for no reason. I appealed but I thought maybe someone wanted to have this content online.
Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
submitted by RedditShadowbangedMe to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Tutorial] Install Armory Wallet 0.96.4 on Fedora Workstation 29

Armory is a very cool open source bitcoin wallet for the power user. You can do neat things with it, read here: https://www.bitcoinarmory.com/
Disclaimer: follow these steps at your own risk. I am not responsible for any damage / loss of funds you might face for following or not following correctly my instructions here. I may have made a typo somewhere or be wrong so do your own research and learn for yourself what I am doing at each step, and what consequences may have for you, at your own risk. These instructions may be wrong somewhere. It worked for me, it doesn't mean it has to work for you.
Requirements for this tutorial:
We are going to build the code from source.
Install dependencies.
I followed these instructions to find the equivalent Fedora packages:
Open the terminal app and run this command:
sudo dnf install git nano qt qt-devel python-devel libtool pyqt4 pyqt4-devel lmdb swig 
And more python packages that I had to install:
sudo pip install twisted qt4reactor psutil 
Importing the signing key to verify the software
Install KGPG to easily manage keys.
sudo dnf install kgpg 
Go to
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x8C5211764922589A
and copy paste the code below the title from
-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
to
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
both included. Then open KGPG from terminal with
kgpg -k 
and click 'Import Key...' > Clipboard > Ok . You should see a confirmation message. Double check the info and close the dialog.
Repeat the process with this other key:
https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0xA4FC919E85C595BA
You can verify both keys are mentioned at the Armory webpage.
Clone and compile the code plus some edits
Before, we installed some dependencies that are named differently than the equivalent Ubuntu/Debian package specified at the Armory documentation. The build process fails for Fedora as the name for the dependency during checks won't match the Fedora version. There's this pull request addressing that, but the code is not part of any release yet.
So the fastest workaround (maybe a bit dirty) was to edit the build config file and correct the name for my Fedora install. Let's begin.
Clone the Armory repository
git clone https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory.git 
Enter the BitcoinArmory dir
cd BitcoinArmory 
Switch to release code
git checkout 'v0.96.4' 
Verify commit signature
git tag -v 'v0.96.4' 
you should see the following message:
> object fee1f91a3137ef1056e15cc606a186b0e508f84c > type commit > tag v0.96.4 > tagger goatpig  1522530739 +0200 > > v0.96.4 > gpg: Signature made Sat 31 Mar 2018 11:12:19 PM CEST > gpg: using RSA key 8C5211764922589A > gpg: Good signature from "goatpig (Offline signing key for Armory releases) " > gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature! > gpg: There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner. > Primary key fingerprint: 745D 707F BA53 968B DF63 AA8D 8C52 1176 4922 589A 
if it looks the same, everything is ok.
Edit the file 'Makefile' file with
gedit Makefile 
And click the three dot menu > Find and Replace...
Configure the options as follows:
https://i.imgur.com/hpS01Kd.png
Click Replace All and close.
Go back to the terminal and run the following commands in order from inside the BitcoinArmory dir. Wait for the previous one to finish before running the next one:
./autogen.sh 
...
./configure 
...
make 
if everything finishes without error you are all done! Run this to start Armory:
python ./ArmoryQt.py 
you are all set. Please let me know if I missed something.
edit: cd git dir.
submitted by AmbitiousSpeed0 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Some problems and sugestions

Hello, i think that established DNM vendors should move out from centralized escrow and start their own direct store so loss of funds, LE seizures and exit scams and anonymart seems to fit very well the purpose. The whole point is that these personal vendors seller should be something considered disposable, son even in the case of hack/seizures no money should be lost and noone should be hamred.
Starting from this point there is the necessity of these things:
1) Server should be bought anonymously and not linkable to anyone (i'm writing a guide about that)
2) No money or private keys should be stored on the server
3) Payment address should be signed with owner pgp key to prevent payment address substitution via hacking
4) All personal information should be encrypted when stored on the server and deleted as soon as they are not needed
As i understand you have implemented 2 and 4 well, while currently 3 can not be implemented because of the payment address generation.
I've tried to deploy anonymart on a fresh Debian 7 x64 but i had the following problems:
1) Composer run out of memory on a 512MB VPS. While this can be solved adding swap, this amount of ram is more than enough to run this type of webserver stack. Requiring more just for composer would be stupid, but you can simply add swap creation and deletion to your init/update script.
2) I had multiple troubles with ufw. I haven't understand yet how but it seems to to cut me out on ssh even when in your script it's specifically allowed.
3) Nginx show nothing in the error log but when i access the newly created hidden service it redirect me to /settings/create which outputs just "Whoops, looks like something went wrong." At that point i don't know how to troubleshoot the problem.
4) Are all these php dependencies really needed? What's the transmission composer package for? I fell like this is horrible for security and even worse assuming you have auto-update. Even if one of them is poorly coded, backdoored (or taken over and backdoored later) or anything else all install would be compromised. I understand the concept of 'not reinventing the wheel', but for the reduced features it offers, i feel like there's really too much required. Obviously that's just an opinion, but this list seems pretty huge even removing symfony and laravel components:
It would also be nice if there were integrated some sort of api, like for example a json list of the products so it would be easy to build a search engine for all anonymart based stores.
I'm also working on modifying the init script to harden the server (add a waf, disable unsecure php functions ecc.).
submitted by dnmseppuku to anonymart [link] [comments]

Full tutorial for setting up a hidden service store

Hello everybody! There are a lot of vendors which reputation is very high and may be trusted for direct orders. If they do not want to rely only on third parties markets and be dependant to their downtime, death, exit scam etc. with this tutorial they will be able to easily setup a private store (and harden it a bit).
Advantages:
Disadvantages:
This tutorial will guide you with the entire procedure, from buying a server to setting up Anonymart. This tutorial assumes that you will start with a freshly installed Debian 7. Other setup and software may interfere with my setup script, so if you are unsure read the source code.

Buying the server

This is probably the hardest part. You should look for a provider who accept Bitcoin and that has not strict practices on verifying customers identities.
One of the best resources for finding out such providers is:
https://www.exoticvps.com/
While there are some providers like vultr.com which will not ask for personal details and will not complain about tor, I'd suggest to avoid such large scale companies (especially if based in the US). For example, if we assume the scenario where everybody choose Vultr because it's the easier place to obtain a server, LE may force Vultr to monitor all instances which generate tor traffic without being a a tor node. After that they may cause some seconds of downtime each and compare the result to the availability of the store. The whole point of this tutorial is to decentralize, and you really should think always about that.
On most providers you can't order via Tor with obviously fake credentials because all of them use MaxMind fraud prevention which will blacklist all orders done via Tor, VPN or anonymous proxies.
First of all install proxychains on your torified system. You can install it in Tails and debian based distributions with
sudo apt-get install proxychains
(on Whonix this step is not required)
Now, in order to place an order which seems legit to fraud prevention we need a clean ip from a residential connection. This is what Socks Proxies exist for so you should buy some at Vip72 (or obviously any other provider). The demo cost 3$ and you can pay with Bitcoin via Tor.
After your payment has been verified you should be able to browse Socks Proxies by their Country/Region.
Select one and test it via proxychains. Proxychains is useful because, as the name says, it can chain proxy, so you can connect to the specified set of proxy you want via tor.
Here's the default configuration:
[ProxyList] # add proxy here ... # meanwile # defaults set to "tor" socks4 127.0.0.1 9050 
Now add the selected proxy to the conf:
sudo nano /etc/proxychains.conf
[ProxyList] # add proxy here ... # meanwile # defaults set to "tor" socks4 127.0.0.1 9050 socks5   
Now open a browser using proxychains:
proxychains chromium
or
proxychains firefox
Keep in mind that this should not be done with tor-browser because it's iser agents and other specifics are detected by the anti fraud system.
If the socks proxy is working you should be able to browse the internet. If nothing loads, just get another socks and change the proxychains configuration.
Now go to http://www.fakenamegenerator.com/ and get something which will match your proxy and seems to be believable.
Choose your provider and try to order depending on which location you prefer and how much money you wish to spend. Keep in mind that this tutorial is aimed to full system, so if you are not ordering a dedicated server but a VPS you should select a full virtualized one (KVM, vmware, XEN-HVM). Unless you're expecting a huge load, 512MB of RAM and 10GB oh storage should be enough.
Your provider will send you an email with information to access to you control panel from where you will be able to install the operating system. This tutorial is specifically for Debian 7 x64 (x86 is ok too), but if you know what you are doing you can obviously

Basic server setup

First of all you have to generate a ssh key if you already don't have one.
ssh-keygen -t ecdsa
With that command we are generating a 256 bits ECDSA key.
If you left the dafult options you should be able to get the public key using:
cat .ssh/id_ecdsa.pub
Now login to your newly installed server. The panel should have generally asked you to provide a root password or sent via email a random generated one. Since here we're assuming that you are on Tails, Whonix or any othe system which force all connections trough tor. In particular, if you are on Tails, you should enable SSH keys persistence. If you continue on the tutorial skipping this part, you will loose your keys and the access to the server as soon as you shutdown your computer.
ssh [email protected]
Answer yes to the first question.
Now the last step:
git clone https://github.com/anonymart/anonymart.git /vawww/anonymart
sh /vawww/anonymart/bin/full_setup.sh
The installation script will update the system, remove useless packages, install the required ones, configure a nginx+php-fpm+mysql stack, configure tor, configure iptables and much more. If everything goes smoothly at the end it should tell you an onion address which will be the the url of your store and an onion address which you will use to connect via ssh to the server instead of the original ip.

Configure anonymart

Now go to your new url. You will be redirected to /settings/create where you will create the basic settings for yout store. Choose a very strong password. Bitcoin address for payments will be generated using your Electrum master key (which can't be used to spend the coins) using BIP32.

Final

I've already coded a small script where vendors may enter their onion url signed with their GPG key. The script will look up on Grams for that GPG key and match the vendor to the url and add it to a public database. If some stores start to popup, i will make it available as a hidden service.
Donations: 12xjgV2sUSMrPAeFHj3r2sgV6wSjt2QMBP

Some notes on anonymart

The original developer of anonymart has decided to abandon the project because interested in something else. I was already collaborating with him before that decision so he decided to pass to me the lead of it. I've reviewed part of the code and i haven't seen security issues, but this doesn't mean it's 100% secure. I'll do my best to review it all and add some missing features like:
  • Two factor authentication
  • Switch from blockchain.info api to lookup on Electrum stratum servers
  • Add the possibility to add more than one image per product
  • Change the order id from incremental to a random one
  • Add JSON api to list store products to facilitate third parties search engines
Unfortunately I'm not very familiar with laravel yet, so before messing with the code I'd need some times, so don't expect huge updates soon.
submitted by spike25 to DeepDotWeb [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA Ubuntu Community Manager at Canonical, author/speaker on Community Management and best practice, and play in metal band Severed Fifth

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2012-06-05
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Link to my post
Questions Answers
Not sure if any of this is really your job descriptions, but they're the questions I have about Ubuntu anyway. I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. Back when we originally released Unity into Ubuntu, there was a lot of (1) and some (2). With Ubuntu 12.04 there is a little (1) and not much (2). Unity in 12.04 is significantly faster, better designed, and better executed and I most of the responses I have seen to 12.04 have been praising Unity.
How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity? How are you and the rest of Canonical dealing with all of the criticisms of Unity?
What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream? In terms of fear of change, there will always be some folks who don't like it: that is fine; we have many wonderful options for desktops in Ubuntu. Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks, and we want Ubuntu to bring Free Software to everyone, not just a fiefdom populated by those with significant technical skills. What's the process of implementing Ubuntu for Android like? What do you expect the response to it to be, and how are device manufacturers responding to it? Is Canonical trying to become the Apple of Linux? What other strategies are you implementing to help Linux go mainstream?
Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu? Can we please get an easier RAID implementation on the desktop flavor Ubuntu?
I believe the criticism around Unity could be divided into two broad categories (1) fear of change and (2) critcism about the design/stability of Unity. "I fear Canonical hasn't been listening to the specific concerns of its community when it comes to Unity in particular. It's not that I'm afraid of change, or that it's unstable, it's that it's ugly, unwieldy to use, and non-configurable. The lack of control and configuration coupled with the fact it's been forced down our throats is what really seems to irk the community".
Some folks though feel like we are "dumbing down Linux"; I thoroughly disagree with that notion. Linux should be for everyone, not just Linux geeks. Also, nothing has been "forced down your throat": this is Free Software and you are free to use something else.
Ubuntu, as it stands, is near unusable for a lot of power users who do heavy development work and constantly need to switch applications - and it's 100% because of Unity and "simplifying" the distro. I'll personally be sticking to Debian until this regression goes away. I would consider myself a power user, I am regularly switching applications and it works fine. But here's the thing: this is all personal opinion. It works well for me, perfect! It doesn't work well for you, well you can either help us fix it or use something else. Perfect! Either way, we all get to use Free Software. :-)
Edit: Er, it looks like pseudolobster hit my concern already. Carry on.
Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu. "Sure, maybe it's time for Ubuntu to move on and try this really ambitious move to dumb down linux for old people, alienating its previous userbase, but it's a damn shame because I used to really like Ubuntu". I always hate to see the term "dumbing down" because it is exclusionary: Ubuntu is for everyone...not just for people with a certain level of expertise. The difference is...for a novice user, they require simple defaults otherwise we lose them, a more technically savvy can dive below the surface and install additional configurability.
Are you still actively trying to push Ubuntu to Android manufacturers/developers? If so, have any responded with any interest? Yes, the convergent device (Ubuntu on Android) is a key area of focus. Canonical engineers have been continuing to build it out and our business team has been working with various handset makers to sign agreements. I believe there are a few deals underway.
Also, any chance that private developers (Cyanogenmod/MIUI/AOKP/AOSP) will get a chance to bake Ubuntu into custom ROMs? As for people taking it and baking it into custom ROMs, I don't see why this couldn't happen in the future. It is unlikely to be one of our standard releases as most people don't install new OSs on their phones, but I am sure the software will be available for integration some time.
You know me in real life, although not by this username. I install a new OS on my phone regularly...so, you know at least one. ;-) Hrm... :-)
How did the Humble Bundle thing go? We're they/Ubuntu receptive and it all went smoothly? Any chance of getting the back catalog into the software center? The Humble Indie Bundle release has gone really well. We had nearly 10000 downloads in 72 hours, and the downloads are continuing. A number of previous games are in the Ubuntu Software Center and we are working on others too.
Also any chance to standardizing a set of libraries for game development in Ubuntu, kind of like what ya'll did for Gtk apps and Quickly? As for Quickly and game development: I would love to see that, we just need a community member to contribute to this. If you (or someone else) wants to help, I would be happy to help you get connected to the right person.
Does this mean that you plan to allow us to link games from previous bundles that are in the software center to our account? I would like to be able to link my purchase of World of Good, Braid, Bittrip runner, and probably othes so that I can more easily download and install them. I think that would be the optimal option.
On a non "I h8 unity" tangent, gaming (and Netflix, to an extent) is a big part of the reason I'm still on Windows some of the time. Are you excited that Steam is coming to Linux? What are the major hurdles, in your opinion, to a better gaming experience on Linux? I am stoked about Steam coming to Linux. The challenge will be hardware support for some graphics cards (most work great), but I suspect that Steam on Linux will apply pressure to the card makers.
What do you see as the future of the music industry? Big, professional, signed artists with major labels.
Newer artists with smaller labels, still probably working part time.
For the big artists, the traditional music industry (make music, sell it, go on tour, sell overpriced merch and tickets etc) works well. This is because for these artists the music companies work like VCs: they put lots of money into different projects and every so often they get a Justin Bieber.
For smaller artists, they are typically working with small labels with barely any marketing budget. This means they sign their value (their music) to a label who often doesn't have the resources to bring the artist up to a higher level.
I believe that for smaller artists, the Creative Commons is the way to go. We did this with Severed Fifth: we grew a community, raised $5000 in funding to record our album, and gave it away for free so others can use it. Our music has appeared in all kinds of music videos on YouTube, in games and elsewhere.
The challenge is for smaller artists who work full time on their music. For weekend warriors like me, money is not that of a deal as I have a job, so giving music away for free is fine. If you are relying on getting paid at a show and need to sell that merch, giving away your music is a big deal, so I understand how some folks are resistant to it.
What type of communication is there between Ubuntu/Canonical and the major PC game developers in regards to promoting more native Linux/.deb version of games? We have a team of people at Canonical who are regularly reaching out to games publishers (e.g. EA) to encourage them to bring their technology to Ubuntu.
I want to develop Free Software and make money out of it. What business models do you suggest so that it can be profitable ? Here are a few models I can think of : make the source available but sell the packaged program ; make the software rely on a service that is not free ; donations ; create closed-source add-ons ; etc. What are your ideas about it, Jono ? Sell it in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Have a donations page on your website.
Sell additional services or materials such as training books, audiobooks, etc.
I think this could make the good stuff happen. :-)
I've been interested in implementing an open source alternative to high end audio studio's software. Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention?
Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios? Do you see Ubuntu and open software making their move into professional studios?
Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade? Is there any open source project related to audio that has been getting your attention? Is there any kind of obstacles that open source audio development has faced these this last decade?
Has there been any dialog with big publishers (like Steinberg, Avid, Propellerhead, etc) about getting their DAWs crossed over to Linux?
Thank you for the answer. :D May the Linux desktop live long and prosper. :) Live long and prosper! :-)
Want to sort me out a summer intern position in your London office? What's that, you do? You're too kind. I am not currently taking any interns. Sorry!
What would be in your opinion the improvements Ubuntu brings to the table compared to other OS (Windows, Mac OS or even Android). Better range of pre-installed software for most users.
What Linux distribution are you running? (Ubuntu?) Secure and virus free experience.
Do you think that major companies feel threatened/insecure with open software, and that is why ATI/nVidia are reluctant to release the libraries for Linux? (at least this was a pain in the ass when I tryed getting the right drivers for my video and sound cards) Free and open, and with a commitment to five years of free security updates for LTSs.
What is your favourite game from the range 2010~2012? Sleek, simple, and elegant user experience.
What is your favorite pokemon? Passionate and friendly community.
Wide range of software in the Ubuntu Software Center.
Strong developer platform.
Etc....
Ubuntu 12.04 for another few weeks until I upgrade to 12.10dev.
I don't think they fear it, I think they just can't justify the investment until they feel the market is bigger.
Not really sure, I am not really a big gamer. :-)
I am not into Pokemon. :-)
Hello, I currently have a home Ubuntu 10.04 server, and I use Lubuntu 12.04 on my Desktop, love them both. I think flavors and derivatives are awesome, and we are very supportive of them. Part of the reason we divide up Ubuntu engineering into Kernel, Foundations, and Desktop is to ensure that the Kernel and Foundations output can be useful for flavors and derivatives too.
I am wondering about what you think about all of the distros that are based on Ubuntu, such as Mint and Pinguy. Does it annoy you that people are moving over to these Ubuntu spinoff's? Or is this just something you expect due to working in the linux community? Our goal here is to build a powerful Free Software platform, and encouraging others to create flavors and derivs is a great feature in building that platform.
What does your job entail as a Community Manager? What does your job entail as a Community Manager? My job is divided into a few different areas. Firstly I build strategy around where we need to build growth and focus on our community (e.g. most recently a strong strategic focus is app developers). Secondly, I manage a team of five community managers who work on different areas (Daniel Holbach (developers), David Planella (app devs / translations), Jorge Castro (cloud), Michael Hall (app devs and upstreams), and Nicholas Skaggs (QA)). Thirdly, I work to ensure Canonical staff members are working with the community and that the values and needs of the community are well served. Finally, I work directly with the community to resolve issues, focus on certain areas, and respond to questions from the community and press.
How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job? How often/how long do you spend doing things related to your job?
What are your top 5 favourite bands? What are your top 5 favourite bands?
canonical seems to have plowed its own furrow in a number of places: it adopted bzr, then git owned the world. It developed launchpad, but everyone went to github. It threw its lot in with eucalyptus, and then jumped horse to openstack. These examples, upstart, storm, etc. - in general, the open source contributions canonical makes tend to be less than successful compared with other companies. is it bad at managing open source projects, or just bad at marketing them? Each of the technologies you highlighted have been successful, but not neccessarily the most popular. In technology I don't think popularity neccessarily means success. As an example, bzr serves our community really well, so does Launchpad, but I agree it has seen limited wider success. I think Canonical manages Open Source projects well...Ubuntu has been very successful, but I think it boils down to what people want...people want Ubuntu, but in many cases people want git instead of bzr.
i think a few years ago, shuttleworth was saying that canonical was not yet breaking even, but would do - by 2008, then 2010. since then it has started even more projects, in even more markets, hired even more people - presumably that goal is still a ways away. do you look forward to the day when canonical doesn't need to rely on largesse? I am glad we are continuing to invest: we have big, hairy, goals. To achieve them we need growth, focus, and strong teams, and I think we have these. We will break even, but this is a game that needs a lot of upfront investment and passionate people.
Will there be a Bitcoin wallet provided in the Software Center soon? If someone submits it for inclusion then yes! :-)
If anyone is reading this and they have made a wallet, find out how to submit it at Link to developer.ubuntu.com
What's your favorite app in the Software Center? My fave app is the GIMP.
Have you ever met Mark Shuttleworth? Indeed, he was over at my house for a BBQ a few weeks ago.
How is he? I have worked with him since I joined Canonical. He is a cool guy, very technically savvy, with a strong vision, and a strong loyalty to people who are loyal to him. He is very passionate about the community and sits on our Community Council and Technical Board and often gets involved in community matters.
Have you ever negotiated with Valve for bringing steam to Ubuntu/Linux? There has been some discussions.
Any chance of another LugRadio reunion show anytime soon? I've re-played the Devil's Drink segment about a hundred times, still always manages to make me laugh. I would love to do another LugRadio show. We just need to figure out a way of getting the team together, which mainly involved me getting to England to record a show. Maybe we could try a G+ thing sometime. :-)
The accomplishments system is a pretty cool play on the gameification theme, but it is very Ubuntu based. Is there a plan for supporting accomplishments that are totally unrelated to Ubuntu and computing? Absolutely! Right now it is very Ubuntu centric as we are building for what we know, but the system supports accomplishments from other projects too. If someone wants to build an Accomplishments Collection for Fedora, FreeBSD, or whatever, the system supports it. You can read more about creating accomplishments at Link to wiki.ubuntu.com
The only piece of the core system that is very Ubuntu specific is that it uses Ubuntu One. If someone wants to submit a branch to support other backends we would be happy to review. :-)
Jono, what was the fate of Ubuntu's "Four Horsemen" since you guys hired a fifth member of the team? Are you guys now officially called the Five Horsemen? These are the questions that keep Ubuntu redditors awake at night. We are now the six horsemen. :-)
My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity? My Question is if the ubuntu developers are thinking in integrating this feature on future versions of Unity?
I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast? I would pay to listen again Lugradio or Shot of Jaq and I don't think I'm the only one. Have you ever thought about making money with a podcast?
I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach? I guess you would love to see available on the Ubuntu Software Center mainstream popular games even if they have DRM and some other important applications like Photoshop, Autocad and etc... But if we fill the desktop with a lot of these things at the end what would be the difference between an Ubuntu desktop and a OSX desktop? Don't you think that open source should create open alternatives and try a different approach?
Lets try again. Unity had terrible reviews. Why did Canonical not listen to their users about the introduction of this? You have to admit, it was a pretty bad reception. Canonical's response to this was similar to RIM's response about poor innovation, or the complete lack of it. They ignored it. That's better, thanks for presenting your question more politely.
When we introduced Unity we knew that chunks of it needed more sheening and refinement. What was important to us was to ensure that Unity was in good shape for Ubuntu 12.04, our next LTS, this is why we dropped in a few releases early to give our users a chance to play with it, share their experiences, share their concerns, and give us a chance to fix these outstanding problems.
Now, as you say, some folks were not happy with Unity. I think part of this was that those early Unity releases has a pretty tiny amount of QA applied: they were crashy, and when Unity crashed, it would take compiz down with it too. To remedy this we built an automated testing lab, and hired someone on my team to build a community of manual testers. I think most would agree that the Unity in 12.04 is much higher quality.
When we introduced Unity originally some folks just didn't like the design. This is always tough: design is emotional, and so is change, so a change with a new design is really emotional. Now some of the feedback at this time was constructive: it highlighted specific deficiencies in the design, problems in the implementation and other things. The design and engineering teams read all of this feedback with interest and reacted to much of it in future releases.
Some folks just didn't like Unity for the fact it was "different" and "why didn't you guys just keep shipping GNOME 2". For us to bring Free Software to more and more people we need to constantly evolve, and Unity was a step along that evolution. We have expanded our target demographic to not just Linux enthusiasts but general consumers too, and we found that GNOME 2 did not serve general consumers as well...as such Unity was designed to bridge that gap.
Now, of course, Unity is not perfect. There is still lots of work to be done, and many improvements to be made, but I think we are on the right track.
One thing I can assure you is that Canonical did not ignore this feedback: quite the opposite, but we did focus on the constructive feedback as opposed to the rantings on social media networks. Ubuntu is a shared project, our community is an integral part of the project, but we have to have a platform of respect and collaboration to do good work...and this is why we focused on the feedback from those who wanted to engage as opposed to yell.
I hope this answers your question. :-)
It's closely related to my major and my career plans, so I'm really curious what goes into it and what kind of surprises I might find myself confronting down the road. I think many new community managers don't build enough strategy into the plans. They have generalized plans around "growth" and "awareness". If you are working professionally for a company, this lack of meat on the bone doesn't give the company or the community enough assurances around the work.
Do you have someone on your team that is focussed on the business desktop users community? Today, not really. Our primary focus is on the collaborative contributor community. This is changing as we focus more and more on user communities (e.g. the app dev community who only want to use Ubuntu as a platform).
2) For those of us looking to contribute to Ubuntu (that have not done so in the past) what areas is the OS lacking, or what areas could we best contribute our skills? I think we need more and more folks helping with LoCo Teams (Link to loco.ubuntu.com and Documentation. We could always use hands on deck there!
Will we ever be able to run DRM protected Silverlight apps like Netflix, or SkyGo? It's pretty much the only thing I can't do on Ubuntu. I would love if we could have Netflix, but it depends on if Netflix are willing to make a Linux client.
I feel you're making a really big mistake here: Pursuing a new demographic while ignoring your core. We are not ignore Linux enthusiasts...we are just not focusing purely on them. Some people presume that just because we don't have everything that a Linux enthusiast needs we are "ignoring" them. We want to build a system for everyone, and that requires a delicate balance.
As I said earlier, for a novice user if we include too much configurabilty that doesn't make sense or is not properly designed, user testing shows that it makes Ubuntu less useful. Technically savvy people can install and add additional configurability where desired. This is why I think it is better to have a simple Unity by default and then allow people to tune and tweak it with additional tools like MyUnity where needed. This way you get the best of both worlds: a simple out of the box experience, yet Linux enthusiasts can hotrod their system to get more if they want.
Any chance of another album any soon? Also, just wanted so say thanks for all the work you in the band and the Ubuntu community. We are currently writing a new Severed Fifth album. I am also thinking of recording an acoustic album for charity.
What can we expect for the future of raspberry pi and ubuntu? I am not really sure. I have not been particularly involved in the discussions with the Raspberry Pi folks: I would love to see Ubuntu running on there.
As a Python developer I would like to ask how the Python 3 integration as the standard version with the next release (12.10) is going? Also, thanks for Ubuntu, just love it for work and personal use and Unity makes it all a joy now. :) To be honest, I am not sure how the Python 3 has progressed thus far...I know it is a core release goal, so it should go pretty well. :-)
Tits or ass? You said any question.... I like all animals, not just Blue Tits and Donkeys.
As a English Ex-Pat Do you have things other than BBQ'ing you are trying to get into the swing of? Perhaps home brewing? I would love to brew some beer. I worry about creating an ultra-death-brew though and losing a weekend. :-)
Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more? Is Canonical accepting interns at all, and if so how can I get to know more?
Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? Aren't you heartily sick of every public discussion you take part in getting hijacked by the small, but excessively vocal, minority of people of just can't deal with people doing some actual work to try and improve the Linux desktop experience (i.e Unity) and prepared to do anything active about their own problems? There is definitely a vocal minority, but my take on this has been that every opinion and critique is fair so long as it is respectful, accurate, and preferably in the interests of finding a solution. Some folks have tried Ubuntu 12.04 and still don't like Unity and have a list of reasons why, and they fairly and respectfully share those views: that kind of discourse is wonderful...it helps us improve.
Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome. Did you pick the band for UDS-Q? They were awesome.
Unity from a year ago ... ignore these people. If Unity a year ago was so bad that you're ignoring the early adopters who got burned by it, why on earth did you let it out the door? Why should they trust you now? Software is never "done", you have to release early and release often; that is at the core of how Open Source works.
"Unity" means − among other things − "the same interface for Desktops, TV, phones, tablets, cars". Have you put any thoughts in Home Automation interfaces, which I think can become a big thing in the future ? While not a core focus of the Unity team right now, I would love to see a community derivative Ubuntu distribution for home automation. I think it could be awesome. :-)
What advice can you give to someone who is new to the field of Community Management? Without wishing to push my book, I think it will be helpful for you. Just make sure you get the new 2nd Edition: there is lots of other good content in there.
My advice for getting started is to study the work of other community managers, and listen and learn from their experience. Community management is a skill that is passed on between different people, and that kind of observational work is useful in seeing patterns and approaches to the profession.
Is the 2nd edition available as an e-book? Yep! :-)
Will you be dressing up as a spherical cow for halloween? Because I'm having a damned hard time finding a quetzal costume. Srsly. :) LOL! I hope so!
Will you be coming to Ground Kontrol after the Puppet Labs party this year, and if so, will we have to physically carry you back across the river? You don't have a keynote this year, so no excuses. :P. I can try. :-)
Any plans to provide funding/grants to the LoCo teams to help them organize events or for doing what they do? Outside of our current funding, I am not sure we will be able to commit to further funding. What I would love to see is LoCo Teams supporting themselves more and more with Kickstarter campaigns and donations drives to help cover any other expenses. :-)
Are there any plans to introduce the minimizing of apps by clicking or holding their icon in the launcher? What is wrong with the minimize button? :-)
Also, are there any plans to make the dash more efficient in finding apps, files, music etc.? The design team are constantly working to improve search and findability, and I think you will see some improvements in the 12.10 cycle in this area.
Hi, recently I bought a samsung series 5 ultrabook and tried to install ubuntu on it. I discovered I couldn't. Is this some king of boycott or the problem is me? Greetings from Brazil. No idea: it should install fine. Was there a software error?
Checked to make sure you had a beard. Not disappointed. LOL!
'Did my first parachute jump' is exactly the sort of thing I was aiming at with the question, human verified accomplishements, perhaps with geo-tagged photo proof. Part of the original plan was to have human-awarded accomplishments. The classic use case we have here is something such as an Ubuntu contributor wanting to thank someone for some great work that cannot be auto-detected with the current system. We would give them the ability to award a trophy to this person so it appears in their My Trophies view.
For your parachute jump example, we could potentially set up a system where a set of people can issue trophies when they see proof of something. For example, you send someone a photo of you doing the jump and then they award the trophy.
This would be great for bucket lists (e.g. visiting a set of landmarks) and then getting trophies for each one you visit.
It is all possible, we just need more hands on deck to write the code. :-)
My uncle has ubuntu on his 3rd and 4th computers. I like to call his little son "ubuntu" Lols were had. Awesome!
Last updated: 2012-06-09 23:45 UTC
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Bitcoin and Other cryptocurrency Library. Skip to main content Switch to mobile version Join the official 2020 Python Developers Survey: Start the survey! Search PyPI Search. Help; Sponsor; Log in; Register; Menu Help; Sponsor; Log in; Register; Search PyPI Search. bitcoinlib 0.4.19 pip install bitcoinlib Copy PIP instructions. Latest version. Released: Sep 8, 2020 Bitcoin and Other ... Installing bitcoin on Debian ‘squeeze’ By bealers. In Legacy. January 22, 2012. 7 Min read. 5 comments. I. Instead of being outdoors I geeked out indoors this weekend and amongst other things installed a Bitcoin daemon on a public facing server so I could have a play with the API/RPC features. Below I document the steps I followed as it turned out to be slightly more taxing than the usual ... Search package directories; Search the contents of packages; Introductory notes . All packages that are included in the official Debian distribution are free according to the Debian Free Software Guidelines. This assures free use and redistribution of the packages and their complete source code. The official Debian distribution is what is contained in the main section of the Debian archive. As ... I want to use bitcoin in Debian. I want to be able to receive BTC and make payments in BTC. I want to keep my wallet locally, on my computer. I want a light client, I don't want to download the entire blockchain. I simply want to be able to pay and receive BTC. What should I use? When I search for this, I'm surprised to not find any binary packages for Debian. Last time I used BTC was many ... Why simply put the pre-build Monero binaries into a deb package? 1) After bitcoin existing for more than 10 years, being popular and being in Debian unstable (sid) it still never made its way into Debian testing, let alone stable. Reason being explained that a difference in underlying libraries (even just security fixes) during compilation may result in a network split. Binaries compiled ...

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Unix & Linux: How to search for Debian packages by tags? Helpful? Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/roelvandepaar With thanks & praise to... The Crypto Dad shows you how to set up the Electrum Bitcoin wallet in the Debian 9 (Stretch) Linux distribution. We go through downloading (with verification) and installing the Electrum bitcoin ... Unix & Linux: Find source of all installed packages on Debian based systems Helpful? Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/roelvandepaar With... Unix & Linux: How to find Debian packages that would free up the most space? Helpful? Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/roelvandepaar Wit... How to search for debian packages with command line? Helpful? Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/roelvandepaar With thanks & praise to God...

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