6 Best Bitcoin Mining Software (That Work) in 2020 ...

MiningPoolHub

This sub is strictly focused on mining on the MiningPoolHub service.
[link]

What is the easiest to use yet still very official and safe bitcoin mining software that would be good for a newbie to try?

Hi all. I'm fairly new to this whole thing. I've known about bitcoin for a while now but never decided to get involved because, as dumb as it might seem to you 1337s out there, I'm not sure I fully understand how to mine safely.
I know that mining isn't worth much, especially since I only have my one computer that I built a year ago and a GTS 450 is probably obsolete even to a mining pool, but I wanted to get started and check it out and if I could get a full grasp on everything it might be worth dedicating some rigs to a mining pool or something.
First though, I want to mine without a pool, even though it may never even create a bitcoin. What should I use to do this? Do I need to know how to code or anything like that or is there a user-friendly interface available to quickly turn my computer into a miner? Also, can I do this on a computer in the background while still having it function fine doing other things?
I have a quad core 3.6 ghz athlon processor, gts 450 graphics, 16 gigs of ram (not that it matters). Any help would be appreciated. I know I can google these things but I've been doing research and I just don't really know what to trust getting into. I know there are a lot of scams out there and malware and such. Just want to be sure I'm doing it all right the first time.
submitted by mrpiratetoyou to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why Osana takes so long? (Programmer's point of view on current situation)

I decided to write a comment about «Why Osana takes so long?» somewhere and what can be done to shorten this time. It turned into a long essay. Here's TL;DR of it:
The cost of never paying down this technical debt is clear; eventually the cost to deliver functionality will become so slow that it is easy for a well-designed competitive software product to overtake the badly-designed software in terms of features. In my experience, badly designed software can also lead to a more stressed engineering workforce, in turn leading higher staff churn (which in turn affects costs and productivity when delivering features). Additionally, due to the complexity in a given codebase, the ability to accurately estimate work will also disappear.
Junade Ali, Mastering PHP Design Patterns (2016)
Longer version: I am not sure if people here wanted an explanation from a real developer who works with C and with relatively large projects, but I am going to do it nonetheless. I am not much interested in Yandere Simulator nor in this genre in general, but this particular development has a lot to learn from for any fellow programmers and software engineers to ensure that they'll never end up in Alex's situation, especially considering that he is definitely not the first one to got himself knee-deep in the development hell (do you remember Star Citizen?) and he is definitely not the last one.
On the one hand, people see that Alex works incredibly slowly, equivalent of, like, one hour per day, comparing it with, say, Papers, Please, the game that was developed in nine months from start to finish by one guy. On the other hand, Alex himself most likely thinks that he works until complete exhaustion each day. In fact, I highly suspect that both those sentences are correct! Because of the mistakes made during early development stages, which are highly unlikely to be fixed due to the pressure put on the developer right now and due to his overall approach to coding, cost to add any relatively large feature (e.g. Osana) can be pretty much comparable to the cost of creating a fan game from start to finish. Trust me, I've seen his leaked source code (don't tell anybody about that) and I know what I am talking about. The largest problem in Yandere Simulator right now is its super slow development. So, without further ado, let's talk about how «implementing the low hanging fruit» crippled the development and, more importantly, what would have been an ideal course of action from my point of view to get out. I'll try to explain things in the easiest terms possible.
  1. else if's and lack any sort of refactoring in general
The most «memey» one. I won't talk about the performance though (switch statement is not better in terms of performance, it is a myth. If compiler detects some code that can be turned into a jump table, for example, it will do it, no matter if it is a chain of if's or a switch statement. Compilers nowadays are way smarter than one might think). Just take a look here. I know that it's his older JavaScript code, but, believe it or not, this piece is still present in C# version relatively untouched.
I refactored this code for you using C language (mixed with C++ since there's no this pointer in pure C). Take a note that else if's are still there, else if's are not the problem by itself.
The refactored code is just objectively better for one simple reason: it is shorter, while not being obscure, and now it should be able to handle, say, Trespassing and Blood case without any input from the developer due to the usage of flags. Basically, the shorter your code, the more you can see on screen without spreading your attention too much. As a rule of thumb, the less lines there are, the easier it is for you to work with the code. Just don't overkill that, unless you are going to participate in International Obfuscated C Code Contest. Let me reiterate:
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
This is why refactoring — activity of rewriting your old code so it does the same thing, but does it quicker, in a more generic way, in less lines or simpler — is so powerful. In my experience, you can only keep one module/class/whatever in your brain if it does not exceed ~1000 lines, maybe ~1500. Splitting 17000-line-long class into smaller classes probably won't improve performance at all, but it will make working with parts of this class way easier.
Is it too late now to start refactoring? Of course NO: better late than never.
  1. Comments
If you think that you wrote this code, so you'll always easily remember it, I have some bad news for you: you won't. In my experience, one week and that's it. That's why comments are so crucial. It is not necessary to put a ton of comments everywhere, but just a general idea will help you out in the future. Even if you think that It Just Works™ and you'll never ever need to fix it. Time spent to write and debug one line of code almost always exceeds time to write one comment in large-scale projects. Moreover, the best code is the code that is self-evident. In the example above, what the hell does (float) 6 mean? Why not wrap it around into the constant with a good, self-descriptive name? Again, it won't affect performance, since C# compiler is smart enough to silently remove this constant from the real code and place its value into the method invocation directly. Such constants are here for you.
I rewrote my code above a little bit to illustrate this. With those comments, you don't have to remember your code at all, since its functionality is outlined in two tiny lines of comments above it. Moreover, even a person with zero knowledge in programming will figure out the purpose of this code. It took me less than half a minute to write those comments, but it'll probably save me quite a lot of time of figuring out «what was I thinking back then» one day.
Is it too late now to start adding comments? Again, of course NO. Don't be lazy and redirect all your typing from «debunk» page (which pretty much does the opposite of debunking, but who am I to judge you here?) into some useful comments.
  1. Unit testing
This is often neglected, but consider the following. You wrote some code, you ran your game, you saw a new bug. Was it introduced right now? Is it a problem in your older code which has shown up just because you have never actually used it until now? Where should you search for it? You have no idea, and you have one painful debugging session ahead. Just imagine how easier it would be if you've had some routines which automatically execute after each build and check that environment is still sane and nothing broke on a fundamental level. This is called unit testing, and yes, unit tests won't be able to catch all your bugs, but even getting 20% of bugs identified at the earlier stage is a huge boon to development speed.
Is it too late now to start adding unit tests? Kinda YES and NO at the same time. Unit testing works best if it covers the majority of project's code. On the other side, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. If you decide to start refactoring your code, writing a unit test before refactoring will help you to prove to yourself that you have not broken anything without the need of running the game at all.
  1. Static code analysis
This is basically pretty self-explanatory. You set this thing once, you forget about it. Static code analyzer is another «free estate» to speed up the development process by finding tiny little errors, mostly silly typos (do you think that you are good enough in finding them? Well, good luck catching x << 4; in place of x <<= 4; buried deep in C code by eye!). Again, this is not a silver bullet, it is another tool which will help you out with debugging a little bit along with the debugger, unit tests and other things. You need every little bit of help here.
Is it too late now to hook up static code analyzer? Obviously NO.
  1. Code architecture
Say, you want to build Osana, but then you decided to implement some feature, e.g. Snap Mode. By doing this you have maybe made your game a little bit better, but what you have just essentially done is complicated your life, because now you should also write Osana code for Snap Mode. The way game architecture is done right now, easter eggs code is deeply interleaved with game logic, which leads to code «spaghettifying», which in turn slows down the addition of new features, because one has to consider how this feature would work alongside each and every old feature and easter egg. Even if it is just gazing over one line per easter egg, it adds up to the mess, slowly but surely.
A lot of people mention that developer should have been doing it in object-oritented way. However, there is no silver bullet in programming. It does not matter that much if you are doing it object-oriented way or usual procedural way; you can theoretically write, say, AI routines on functional (e.g. LISP)) or even logical language if you are brave enough (e.g. Prolog). You can even invent your own tiny programming language! The only thing that matters is code quality and avoiding the so-called shotgun surgery situation, which plagues Yandere Simulator from top to bottom right now. Is there a way of adding a new feature without interfering with your older code (e.g. by creating a child class which will encapsulate all the things you need, for example)? Go for it, this feature is basically «free» for you. Otherwise you'd better think twice before doing this, because you are going into the «technical debt» territory, borrowing your time from the future by saying «I'll maybe optimize it later» and «a thousand more lines probably won't slow me down in the future that much, right?». Technical debt will incur interest on its own that you'll have to pay. Basically, the entire situation around Osana right now is just a huge tale about how just «interest» incurred by technical debt can control the entire project, like the tail wiggling the dog.
I won't elaborate here further, since it'll take me an even larger post to fully describe what's wrong about Yandere Simulator's code architecture.
Is it too late to rebuild code architecture? Sadly, YES, although it should be possible to split Student class into descendants by using hooks for individual students. However, code architecture can be improved by a vast margin if you start removing easter eggs and features like Snap Mode that currently bloat Yandere Simulator. I know it is going to be painful, but it is the only way to improve code quality here and now. This will simplify the code, and this will make it easier for you to add the «real» features, like Osana or whatever you'd like to accomplish. If you'll ever want them back, you can track them down in Git history and re-implement them one by one, hopefully without performing the shotgun surgery this time.
  1. Loading times
Again, I won't be talking about the performance, since you can debug your game on 20 FPS as well as on 60 FPS, but this is a very different story. Yandere Simulator is huge. Once you fixed a bug, you want to test it, right? And your workflow right now probably looks like this:
  1. Fix the code (unavoidable time loss)
  2. Rebuild the project (can take a loooong time)
  3. Load your game (can take a loooong time)
  4. Test it (unavoidable time loss, unless another bug has popped up via unit testing, code analyzer etc.)
And you can fix it. For instance, I know that Yandere Simulator makes all the students' photos during loading. Why should that be done there? Why not either move it to project building stage by adding build hook so Unity does that for you during full project rebuild, or, even better, why not disable it completely or replace with «PLACEHOLDER» text for debug builds? Each second spent watching the loading screen will be rightfully interpreted as «son is not coding» by the community.
Is it too late to reduce loading times? Hell NO.
  1. Jenkins
Or any other continuous integration tool. «Rebuild a project» can take a long time too, and what can we do about that? Let me give you an idea. Buy a new PC. Get a 32-core Threadripper, 32 GB of fastest RAM you can afford and a cool motherboard which would support all of that (of course, Ryzen/i5/Celeron/i386/Raspberry Pi is fine too, but the faster, the better). The rest is not necessary, e.g. a barely functional second hand video card burned out by bitcoin mining is fine. You set up another PC in your room. You connect it to your network. You set up ramdisk to speed things up even more. You properly set up Jenkins) on this PC. From now on, Jenkins cares about the rest: tracking your Git repository, (re)building process, large and time-consuming unit tests, invoking static code analyzer, profiling, generating reports and whatever else you can and want to hook up. More importantly, you can fix another bug while Jenkins is rebuilding the project for the previous one et cetera.
In general, continuous integration is a great technology to quickly track down errors that were introduced in previous versions, attempting to avoid those kinds of bug hunting sessions. I am highly unsure if continuous integration is needed for 10000-20000 source lines long projects, but things can be different as soon as we step into the 100k+ territory, and Yandere Simulator by now has approximately 150k+ source lines of code. I think that probably continuous integration might be well worth it for Yandere Simulator.
Is it too late to add continuous integration? NO, albeit it is going to take some time and skills to set up.
  1. Stop caring about the criticism
Stop comparing Alex to Scott Cawton. IMO Alex is very similar to the person known as SgtMarkIV, the developer of Brutal Doom, who is also a notorious edgelord who, for example, also once told somebody to kill himself, just like… However, being a horrible person, SgtMarkIV does his job. He simply does not care much about public opinion. That's the difference.
  1. Go outside
Enough said. Your brain works slower if you only think about games and if you can't provide it with enough oxygen supply. I know that this one is probably the hardest to implement, but…
That's all, folks.
Bonus: Do you think how short this list would have been if someone just simply listened to Mike Zaimont instead of breaking down in tears?
submitted by Dezhitse to Osana [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

7 Ways to Earn LTC/Litecoin ASAP

Earning free Litecoin works similarly to earning free Bitcoin. There are several online platforms that give users free Litecoins for performing small tasks or playing online games.
Let’s explore some of the most popular ways to get free Litecoin.

Earn free Litecoin through reputable faucets

The easiest and most popular way to earn free Litecoin is through a Litecoin faucet. A faucet is a website or an application that gives users free crypto coins for completing simple tasks. These tasks are usually easy tasks like completing some captchas, viewing adverts, or playing simple games.
After completing the microtasks, the faucet will reward you with a small amount of Litecoin (Lithoshi). Litoshi is the smallest unit of Litecoin and 1 Lithoshi is equivalent to 0.000000001 Litecoin.
There are various Litecoin faucets out there, many of them being scam faucets. Before you choose a faucet platform, make sure it’s legit. Here, we will highlight a few of the most popular and reputable ones.
It is safe to mention that you should only register on faucets that integrate micro-wallets like Coinpot. Micro-wallets allow you to collect and combine faucet payments easily.

Litecoin Faucet

Just like the previously mentioned faucet, Litecoin Faucet also allows users to earn free Litecoin by solving captchas. You can earn as much as 2,500,000 Litoshis every hour with no daily limitation on the platform.
The unique feature of Litecoin Faucet is that there is no withdrawal limit. Therefore, you can withdraw any amount of Litecoin.
Faucets are sure ways of earning free Litecoin, but you have to be very careful not to fall victim to scams. Before registering on any faucet, look out for the following:
Online reviews to know if it is legit or scam.
Coinpot or Faucethub micro — wallet integration for easy withdrawal.
Deposit before withdrawal feature — This is a typical feature of scam faucets. Faucets are supposed to be free ways to earn Litecoin without any down payment.
Earnings per hour — earnings from faucets are usually small. If a faucet promises an incredible amount of Litecoin, it is probably a scam or total waste of time.
Litecoins earnings from faucets are usually really small. If your earning expectations are high, this might not be the best option for you. There are more lucrative and legit ways to earn free Litecoin. Read on to learn about the other ways to get free Litecoin.

Litecoin cloud mining

Litecoin mining is one of the oldest ways to get free Litecoin. In recent times, earning profits from Litecoin mining can be a major hassle simply because of the cost of setting up the mining device, the cost of electricity, and many other factors.
With the introduction of cloud mining, you can earn free Litecoin without the headaches involved in setting up mining kits. You can find lots of free Litecoin cloud mining contracts online.
All you need to do is download the software on your device to start earning. These software work by using your device’s memory to generate the Litecoin. Which means the more powerful your device, the more free Litecoin you can earn.
However, some of these free Litecoin software contains malicious scripts that can compromise your security by stealing your data. You should only download mining software with great online reviews.
Back when LTC started, it was possible to mine with a standard computer’s CPU or GPU. Unfortunately, as coins grow in both age and popularity, it becomes harder and harder to mine with low-cost equipment. The days of easy mining are over, but that doesn’t mean you still can’t profit from LTC mining.
There are three ways to begin your LTC mining adventure:
Solo mining
Part of a mining pool
Cloud mining

Litecoin lending

Litecoin lending is one of the most lucrative ways to obtain free Litecoin. You can make money by purchasing some Litecoin and lending others on lending platforms.
Lending platforms like Coinloan.io allow you to make as much as 10.5% ROI by lending your LTC. It means if you lend 100 LTC, you earn free 10.5 LTC within a year without doing anything.
By lending your Litecoin, you are making your money work for you. All you need is a trusted and secure lending platform to start earning free Litecoin with this method.

Wager your Litecoin

Another way to get free Litecoin is by wagering your Litecoin. Gambling is not the best way to earn free Litecoin because 70% of gamblers tend to lose more than what they earn.
No doubt that some people have actually managed to become rich through gambling, this, however, is very rare. So if you are a big risk-taker or you really love gambling, Litecoin gambling is one way to earn free Litecoin.
Crypto gambling websites like fortunejack.com, bitstarz.com, and kingbillycasino.com allow you to wager your Litecoin on various casino games. Crypto gambling is probably the riskiest way to earn free Litecoin, and it is not for the faint-hearted.

Invest In Litecoin​

If you’re looking to invest in Litecoin, it’s important to remember that Litecoin is a currency. This means it doesn’t act like a stock or bond. Instead of buying shares of Litecoin, you are swapping your currency for Litecoin currency.
For example, 1 LTC is equal to about $47 USD today. The goal is for the value of Litecoin to rise, in which case, you could exchange your Litecoins back to dollars (from someone willing to do the exchange).​

Referral Links for Crypto Exchanges

This one is good for those out there with friends that are also crypto savvy. Various exchanges offer affiliate programs where you get paid out for inviting your friends and colleagues onto their platform.
Exchanges like Coinbase offer a one time payment when a new person joins their platform while others like Cryptmixer, for example, gives its members an impressive 50% of the revenue from the new clients they bring in. You can also use their exchange to swap the Bitcoin you receive to Litecoin, making it a great way to earn LTC.
submitted by MonishaNuij to MonMonCrypto [link] [comments]

Some Basics Of Bitcoin

For someone not familiar with Bitcoin, the first question that comes to mind is, "What is Bitcoin?" And another common question that is often asked relates to the Bitcoin price. It started out a under 10 cents per Bitcoin upon its introduction in early 2009. It has risen steadily since and has hovered around $4000 per Bitcoin recently. So regarding Bitcoin value or the Bitcoin rate this is a most remarkable appreciation of value and has created many, many millionaires over the last eight years.
The Bitcoin market is worldwide and the citizens of China and Japan have been particularly active in its purchase along with other Asian countries. However, recently in Bitcoin news the Chinese government has tried to suppress its activity in that country. That action drove the value of Bitcoin down for a short time but it soon surged back and is now close to its previous value.
The Bitcoin history chart is very interesting. Its creator was an anonymous group of brilliant mathematicians (using the pseudonym Satoski Nakamoto) who designed it in 2008 to be "virtual gold" and released the first Bitcoin software in early 2009 during the height of the USA economic crisis. They knew that to have lasting value, it like gold had to have a finite supply. So in creating it they capped the supply at 21 million Bitcoin.
Bitcoin mining refers to the process by which new Bitcoin is created. With conventional currency, government decides when and where to print and distribute it. With Bitcoin, "miners" use special software to solve complex mathematical problems and are issued a certain number of Bitcoin in return.
A question that then arises is, is Bitcoin mining worth it. The answer is NO for the average person. It takes very sophisticated knowledge and a powerful computer system and this combination of factors makes it unattainable for the masses. This applies even more to bitcoin mining 2017 than in past years.
Many wonder, who accepts Bitcoin? This question gets asked in various ways, what are stores that accept bitcoin, what are websites that accept bitcoins, what are some retailers that accept bitcoin, what are some places that accept bitcoin and where can I spend bitcoin.
More and more companies are beginning to see the value of accepting cryptocurrencies as a valid payment option. Some major companies that do are DISH network, Microsoft, Expedia, Shopify stores, Newegg, Payza, 2Pay4You, and others.Two major holdouts at this time are Walmart and Amazon.
Ethereum is the strongest rival to Bitcoin in the cryptocurrency market and many wonder at the question of Bitcoin vs Ethereum. Ethereum was created in mid-2015 and has gained some popularity but still ranks far behind Bitcoin in usage, acceptance and value.
A question that often comes up often relates to Bitcoin scam. This author has a friend who made a purchase from a company that promised 1-2% growth per day. The company website listed no contact information and after a couple months the website simply vanished one day and my friend lost all the money he had invested which was several thousand dollars.
One has to know how to buy Bitcoins, how to purchase Bitcoin or how to buy Bitcoin with credit card in order to get started. Coinbase is a very popular site to do this. Their fee is 3.75% and the buying limit is $10,000 per day. This would probably be the easiest way to buy bitcoins.
Others would like to buy Bitcoin with debit card. Coinbase also provides this service and has clear step by step instructions on how to proceed with either your debit or credit card.
There are those who would like to buy Bitcoin instantly. This can be done at Paxful, Inc. and can be done through W. Union or any credit/debit card.
Other common questions that come up are what is the best way to buy Bitcoins, the best way to get bitcoins or where to buy bitcoins online. The easiest way is probably to purchase it through a digital asset exchange like the previously mentioned Coinbase. Opening an account with them is painless and once you link your bank account with them you can buy and sell Bitcoin quite easily. This is quite likely also the best place to buy Bitcoins.
One must know what a Bitcoin wallet is and how to use it. It is simply the Bitcoin equivalent of a bank account. It allows you to receive Bitcoins, store them and send them to others. What it does is store a collection of Bitcoin privacy keys. Typically it is encrypted with a password or otherwise protected from unauthorized access.
There are several types of digital wallets to choose from. A web wallet allows you to send, receive and store Bitcoin though your web browser. Another type is a desktop wallet and here the wallet software is stored directly on your computer. There are also mobile wallets which are designed for use by a mobile device.
A question that occasionally comes up is that of Bitcoin stock or how to buy Bitcoin stock. By far the most common way to proceed in this area is to buy Bitcoin directly and not its stock.
There is one entity called Bitcoin Investment trust which is an investment fund that is designed to track the market flow of Bitcoin. Some analysts however are calling this a risky way to become involved in this marketplace.
The Bitcoin exchange rate USD is a closely watched benchmark both on a daily basis and long term over the last 8 years since its introduction to the world's financial marketplace. A popular company to receive the most current rate in Bitcoin valuation is XE. They show Bitcoin to USD valuation and also the complete Bitcoin price chart, the Bitcoin value chart and the Bitcoin to USD chart. If you ask, "How much is one Bitcoin?" you will always know from their continuously updated charts.
Similar questions that come up in this area relate to the bitcoin rate history, the bitcoin price chart live, the bitcoin to dollar exchange rate, the bitcoin dollar chart and the bitcoin 5 year chart. The previously mentioned website, xe, is also a good source for answers to these questions.
Regarding Bitcoin cash, ie. to get USD from selling Bitcoin, Bitwol is one company that enables you to do this. WikiHow is another company that will take you through this process.
submitted by shomesrobery to BestBitcoinCasinosa [link] [comments]

My stock study watchlist. would appreciate criticisms or red flags

Core
- FB ecosystem
This is the stock that i believe is invested in the right places and has a path forward in the global market. I work as a React developer in fintech and I greatly enjoy their technology. The reason I stopped using snapchat was because I couldn't use it on low connection in Mexico, but Instagram worked marvelously. I use Whatsapp to stay in touch with my family in mexico and Facebook to stay in touch with my mom. There's something extremely powerful about that in my opinion.
They're conservative with their push and development of camera and VR technology which is wise in my opinion give the many opportunities that exist in that space. They're pushing along with fintech in India, again with small business through Whatsapp. And they provide a suite of customer services for small business and entrepeneurs.

- Microsoft
I think they will have a great run during the cloud era of software development. Their acquiring of Github AND NPM goes to show how in touch they are with developer servicing.

- Paypal
Paypal has a marvelous history and is a battle tested pioneer in the fintech space. I see them repeating their previous successes by acquiring Honey. I work with Honey in the fintech space and now I'm understanding that Paypal has an auto coupon scraper on my Amazon purchases while my Visa ones don't. This is the forward thinking I love from Paypal despite not being as flashy as Square.

- Disney
Disney is quintessential american entertainment. I believe their deep roots in American culture and the entertainment industry will provide a solid bedrock for them for the generations to come.

- Waste Management
Sanitation and environmental, like internet connection technology, are about the same when it comes to market penetration. It is a scarcity. Sanitation is a critical part of any society's development and wellbeing. I think WM will be there to benefit from increased urbanization and industriousness from technology and wealth growth.

- Kansas City Southern
I'm Mexican and my family are avocado farmers. I believe in the future prospects of Mexico and its relationship with its neighbors. Mexico is a bustling nation and many youth are international students that carry degrees. This is a far cry from having military policing streets in rural neighborhoods decades ago. Kansas city southern is part of the supply chain that connects Mexico to main industrious Mexican states like Monterrey, Jalisco, and Michaocan. I like rail in this regard because it's a lot of weight in one operation of heavy materials. So Canadians that use Mexican mining will also benefit from this railroad.
- Nintendo
I believe in the future of gaming as a market and if I were to take a shot at who would be the most stable, I would vote for Nintendo. Like Facebook, they approach the family unit and grow generationally. I love their curveball approach to gaming and I think that creativity, along with it's customers trust, will be something I can hold onto for a long time versus companies that have a history of developing games like Call of Duty or World of Warcraft. Nintendo can take different forms: in the living room, at sweaty tournaments, online, mobile, on your phone, on a TV, in the movies, etc.

Closely watching
- United Health or Cigna
This is only going to grow and wont change due to American politics for 8 years at a minimum.
- Cisco
Same as Microsoft but for IT.
- Impossible Foods IPO
I've been vegetarian for 10 years and Impossible Burgers has been one of the most mindblowing experiences of my life. The product is phenomenal and on a league of its owned compared to Beyond Meat. IMHO Beyond taste like cheap school lunchroom burgers and Impossible tastes like something I would be excited to feed my family. If their pork products are great then I am ALL in because Chicken products are by far the easiest thing to replicate. I'm extremely excited about this product.
- Visa
They make a ton of money on transactions. I saw them hiring for blockchain development so it leads me to believe that they're adapting.
- Square
I work in the fintech space and I like their modest approach to financial services. Their acquiring of a bank charter is actually incredibly important due to all the procurement and legal processes that go behind being a fintech company (abiding by federal security laws, etc). The one reason I like Chase banking is because I enjoy their app. I see Square as a competitor to Chase, surprisingly.
- Apple
Apple designs its products with customer service in mind. I think the future of education technology will likely go to Apple because of this. Their screens and cameras are wonderful and I can see them pioneering computer vision products because of this. They are THE American Tech company.
- TMobile
Aggressive as hell and grew to be a large player through savvy moves across time. Their customer service is a highlight for me.
- JPM
Customer service for banking is unmatched IMO. If any legacy banker will make it across changes, I believe Chase is doing what it takes to adapt and think forward.
- Planet Fitness
$10 gyms, clean, and casual enough for the general population. You can't beat $10 gym membership when you're broke as fuck. I've been a heavy lifter before and still used Planet fitness in my transitions across states and whatnot. I need to look at their numbers more closely.
- Volkwagen
I trust Europe and Japan to take EVs more seriously. I don't know who will seriously come close to competing with Tesla in the long run but they'll have to.
- Panasonic
Panasonic, much like AMD, did not immediately reflect the value of what they have produced. AMD did not explode inline with bitcoin or cheaper GPU consumption, in the same way Panasonic did not reflect a massive spike in price after speculation in Tesla grew. They're an important arm to the EV market that spreads across many players ranging from Tesla to Toyota to big tech.

- Lyft
I think Lyft's focus on customer service and regional clientele will pay off against Uber, who is growing too quickly and spreading thin. Lyft will benefit from the development of computer vision and Big tech's interest in automanufacturing.

- Crypto (Bitcoin or XRP)
I like crypto as a technology as a software engineer. I see the value in a faster process for procuring and exchanging legal tender that does not have to go through the bottleneck of the ACH process or through legal issues like the PATRIOT ACT or the Bank Secrecy Act. It still fundamentally respects those laws without the frustrations of banking service bottlenecks. I think the halvening protocol has an interesting affect on Bitcoin and supply and the market that it's trying to generate.







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submitted by codingprofessor to investing [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

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Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

Zhuoer Jiang: Talk about the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV

https://preview.redd.it/kcdq7qrjnyd51.jpg?width=570&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=af67bd46683fbe3ffa6c081d490d69598dd83bbb
1. When do you contact Bitcoin? What do you think of the blockchain industry?
I came into contact with Bitcoin in October 2013. At that time, I was making game aids, which involved the issue of collecting money from Taiwan and Southeast Asia.
The reason for cultivating the blockchain industry is that blockchain is the only industry that can provide economic freedom. The blockchain is decentralized and has no control center, so no one can eliminate it, so it provides economic freedom. The counter-example is Qvod player. Although Qvod player also has tens of thousands of nodes, it is centralized. As long as the control center is killed, the Qvod player network will die. (QvodPlayer is a Chinese-based video-on-demand playback software, using P2P technology, users can watch online film and television programs through buffering. In mainland China, QvodPlayer has a huge number of users. Due to the use of a dedicated transmission protocol, QvodPlayer is used by some users to download banned videos, such as violent or pornographic videos, and politically sensitive videos. In addition, pirated movies are rampant in QvodPlayer)
I am not a Bitcoinist. As long as other tokens provide economic freedom, I will buy them with real money. My position portfolio is BCH 40% + BTC 30% + ETH 20% + economically free innovative currency 10%, and I think that ETH is likely to exceed BTC in total market value in this bull market.
2. What is the difference between BTC, BCH and BSV?
The easiest thing to see is the difference in block size. BTC blocks have been locked at about 1MB, while BSV advocates infinite blocks. BCH advocates a moderate block size, which cannot exceed the carrying capacity of an ordinary computer. The current value is about 32MB.
Both BTC and BSV have gone to extremes. The BTC development team, Core, pursues extreme decentralization, resulting in too small blocks and high transaction fees. In the last bull market, a transaction fee was as high as hundreds of thousands of yuan, which caused a large number of BTC users to flow out to BCH, ETH and other tokens.
Some people think that BTC can rely entirely on stored-value users instead of using users to survive. This is impossible. If there are no users, there are no stored value users. For example, gold is obviously more suitable for storing value, but almost everyone has bank deposits, except for the elderly, almost no one uses gold to store value. To
People usually use paper money to store value, and naturally they also use paper money to store value. It is impossible to use paper money to store value with gold, and it is impossible to use paper money for small transactions and gold for large transactions. Currency has a scale effect, and it must be a winner takes all.
BSV has gone to the other extreme. The blockchain is enough to store transaction data, but if the blockchain is used as cloud storage, no amount of space is enough. Think about how many resources the world has to store. The result is that the performance requirements are too high, the number of nodes is drastically reduced, and the foundation of the blockchain, which is decentralization, is lost. In the end, it falls into the same fate as the Qvod player. To
Behind the different block sizes are the differences in the spirit of the three. Just like during the Opium War, the difference between Britain and China's Qing Dynasty was not a superficial weapon, but a complete political, economic, and technological gap behind it.
Both BTC and BSV are irrational and religious to a certain extent. BTC advocates a deadlock block size, and BSV advocates a deadlock protocol. The two are very similar.
In terms of rational development and serving users, BCH has won. For example, the issuance of tokens is an important function and rigid demand of the blockchain. Tokens can already be issued on BCH through several protocols such as Wormhole and SLP, while BTC and BSV cannot yet. This is a huge difference in development.
3. Under what circumstances can BCH exceed BTC?
BCH has to wait for users to slowly develop until the number of users and transactions exceed BTC. Although under normal circumstances, the currency has a scale effect, this situation is unlikely to happen, but BTC made a fatal mistake, and locked the block and locked the user.
What if BTC expands like BCH?
First of all, BTC cannot be expanded because the expansion requires a hard fork, regardless of whether it is within the community or the Core, it must adhere to 1MB, insist on extreme decentralization, and BTC must be able to run on the Raspberry Pi. The result is that the expansion advocates in BTC and Core re-hard fork.
Isn't this the plot of the hard fork of BCH from BTC in 2017? So what are these "advocates" doing hard forking again? Just go straight to BCH.
Therefore, BTC must undergo a hard fork to expand, so it cannot be expanded.
So BCH only needs to catch up, which is a fixed goal. I estimate that in this bull market, BCH can exceed the number of users. At that time, BCH had a solid foundation of users and communities. The price increase only increases the price of BCH, the value of BCH is determined by the number of users, and the price fluctuates around the value.
4. Will BCH hard fork happen? What impact will it have on us later?
The BCH community has recently had a lot of discussions on the issue of miner donations, which reflects the decentralization of BCH.
If BCH is controlled by bitmain, why it took a long time for bitmain to implement this problem? Conversely, if CSW wants to modify something on BSV, it can be passed immediately.
5. Do you think BCH is worth long-term ownership?
I often say: "Ask God in the short term, and the number of users in the long term."
The longer the time, the more worth holding BCH. BCH is developing rapidly due to the correct route. I just gave an example. There are already several schemes for issuing tokens on BCH, but neither BTC nor BSV have one. Part of it is because BSV locks the protocol and is not convenient for development. The other part It is because the BSV community has inherited the characteristics of CSW and only speaks big words and does not do practical things.
Therefore, it is definitely worth holding for 1 to 2 years, and the rate of increase is likely to be higher than that of BTC. I predict that the highest point of this round of bull market for BCH will rise from about 3.6% of BTC to 10% to 20% of BTC.
8. Free Q&A
"Will Bitcoin die due to quantum computers or other reasons?"
Certainly not, at best, replace a quantum-resistant algorithm. Looking at it now, quantum computers will not be practical for a long time. And I think quantum computers may not be able to solve the NP problem, that is, the current asymmetric encryption problem, which may not be possible mathematically.
"The impact of the proliferation of contract transactions on currency prices?"
The currency price is ultimately determined by the number of users, not by speculative users. The proliferation of futures trading has happened long ago. From 2016 to 2017, in the presence of a large number of futures trading, BTC rose 100 times.
"Will you be notified when you escape?"
I will definitely not inform. I have already made predictions. I think the bull market may end in the second half of 2021. Or conversely, this bull market may last for two to three years, and two years are more likely.
Why not notify? Most of my clients are miners, and the currency price directly affects the income of the miners. If the currency price drops due to my notification, the interests of my clients will be damaged.
"Recommended regular investment in 2019, what strategy is recommended in 2020?"
This year's bull market has begun, and it must be a full position investment. The cost of regular investment to buy coins later is very high.
"Is it better to speculate or to mine now?"
Most people can't insist on holding the token from start to finish. Most people are in the middle of the bull market, or even sell it at the beginning, and then miss the entire bull market.
Only miners, no matter what level of miners, will hold the token from beginning to end. During the entire bull market, miners are very profitable. Miners will certainly not sell the goose that lays golden eggs like mining machines in the bull market, so miners tend to make more. The earliest miners are basically still active in the market, and their wealth is free, while the earliest holders of coins are almost gone.
submitted by paulcheung1990 to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

FAQ for Beginners

What is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin is scarce, decentralized, and global digital money that cannot be censored.

Quick Advice

  • Do not respond to strangers messaging you with investment advice or offers and read how to avoid being scammed from the posts below.
  • Do not invest in Bitcoin until you do basic research, paid off all high interest debt, and have a emergency savings account of a stable fiat currency.
  • If investing do not expect to get rich quickly. You should expect to wait at least 1-2 years before taking profits. Bitcoin is currently very volatile. In the interim spend and replace Bitcoin because its a useful currency.
  • Beginners should avoid all mining and day trading until at least very familiar with Bitcoin. Mining is very professional(You cannot efficiently mine with your computer and need to buy special ASIC machines) and most people lose money day trading.
  • Never store your Bitcoins on an exchange or web wallet. Buy your bitcoins and withdraw it to your personal wallet where you actually own them instead of IOUs. Services like Robinhood and Revoult should be avoided because you cannot withdraw or use Bitcoin.
  • Make sure you make a backup of your wallet(software holding keys to your BTC) and preferably keep it offline and physical and private. Typically 12 to 24 words you write down on paper or metal. This onetime backup will restore all your keys, addresses , and Bitcoins on a new wallet if you lose your old wallet.
  • Beginners should avoid altcoins, tokens, and ICOs at least initially until they learn about Bitcoin. Most of these are scams and you should be familiar with the basics first. Bitcoin is referred to as BTC or XBT.

Exchanges Requiring ID Verification

Bitcoin = BTC or XBT on exchanges
Exchange Buy fee* Withdraw BTC Notes
Cash App Sliding ~2.2% to 1% 0 BTC Instant Withdraw, USA only
Coinbase Debit3.99% ACH1.49% 1-4USD ~7Day hold BTC withdraw
CoinbasePro 0.5% 1-4USD ~7Day hold free ACH Deposit or €0.15 EUR SEPA fee
Gemini 1.49% to 0.25%ATrader 0 BTC 10 free BTC withdraws w/ActiveTrader
Kraken 0.16% 0.0005 BTC Deposit Fiat=USwire+5USD or SEPA free
Bitstamp 0.50% 0.0005 BTC Deposit Fiat=0 SEPA or 5% card fee
Note: Exchanges all have unique market prices and spreads so fees alone will not tell you the best rates. Best way is to directly compare the rates between exchanges. Buy fees above are for normal trading volumes. Verification and hold times can vary based upon lack of history, verification level or credit.
More exchanges per location
For a secure Decentralized Exchange (DEX) use https://bisq.network

Recommended Wallets

Best wallets for securing small amounts of BTC
electrum For Desktop and Android
Pros= Great Desktop and Android wallet with advanced functionality like coin control
Cons= UX is not as polished as some other wallets, make sure you only upgrade from official sources like play store or https://electrum.org as malicious servers or adverts can tell you to upgrade malware from other sites
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4EhZg5QslI
Phoenix LN wallets for Android
Pros- Lightning network integration(as well as onchain) allowing you to spend with LN merchants for instant confirmations and much lower fees. Easiest lightning wallet to use
Cons- Lightning is still somewhat experimental and less merchants accept it.
https://phoenix.acinq.co/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx5PK1H5OR0
Breez LN wallet for Android and IOS
https://breez.technology
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_4b-y4T8bY
Pros- Lightning network integration(as well as onchain) allowing you to spend with LN merchants for instant confirmations and much lower fees
Cons- Lightning is still somewhat experimental and less merchants accept it.
Other Lightning wallets - http://lightningnetworkstores.com/wallets
Blockstream Green Wallet IOS and android wallet
Pros- Great UX, easy hardware wallet and full node integration, RBF, HW wallet support and advanced 2fa options Cons- Until single signature is released 2 of 2 multisig means that one must depend upon blockstream’s server for tx signing. Other light wallets are dependent upon other servers as well but light wallets like electrum allow you to swap servers.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO3Zi9D5b0Y
https://blockstream.com/green/
Securing Larger amounts of Bitcoin
ledger nano S wallet = ~68 USD https://shop.ledger.com/products/ledger-nano-s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YI1OntWB7wc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGe2GgfkO64
trezor one wallet = ~54 USD https://shop.trezor.io
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pT1j_kbZBEo
Trezor Model T = ~164 USD https://shop.trezor.io
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3BIo5Ac_n4
Cold Card Hardware wallet = 119.97 USD https://store.coinkite.com/store/coldcard
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kocEpndQcsg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8dBNrlwJ0k
Digital Bitbox 02 = 109 USD https://shiftcrypto.ch/bitbox02/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdP_7LgZw7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7nRq2OEhiw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D4FgJo3j64
Best Advanced Bitcoin Wallet= Bitcoin Core
Pros= Great privacy and security
Cons= UX is for more experienced users, takes ~week to sync and requires ~5GB minimum disk space if prunned
https://bitcoincore.org/en/download/
Best High Privacy Bitcoin Wallet = Wasabi
Pros= Best Privacy with Chaumian CoinJoin built in
Cons= mixing coins costs more fees and for more advanced users
https://www.wasabiwallet.io/#download
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECQHAzSckK0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPKpC9cRcZo&list=PLmoQ11MXEmahCG1nkbKK6DiAwVx9giJCi
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8wQK-Ndl3Q&list=PLPj3KCksGbSaEmjU0sywoTYDVYYSu8LsS

Further Resources

https://www.lopp.net/bitcoin-information.html
https://www.lopp.net/lightning-information.html
https://10hoursofbitcoin.com/
http://bitcoinrabbithole.org/
https://bitcoin-resources.com
https://www.bitcoin101.club
https://21lessons.com
submitted by bitusher to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

GPU Mining Crash Course - START HERE!

Welcome All to the GPUMining Crash Course!
With the increase in prices in cryptocurrency, a lot of people are getting back into mining and a lot of people are brand new to the concept overall. So, I quickly wrote this crash course to help you understand what to expect and how to successfully mine your first cryptocurrency. This crash course isn't gonna have all of the fluff you'd see in a normal publication. This is just everything you need to know to get up and running on your first cryptocurrency mining rig.

What is cryptocurrency mining?

One of the main things about cryptocurrencies is that they are "decentralized". Sounds great, but WTF does that even mean? Well, the easiest way to explain it is...
You know how if you want to send your friend/family money digitally, you can do so through your bank. Your bank likely takes a transaction fee and in a few days they will transfer the money. Since cryptocurrencies are decentralized, they don't have a bank or organization to fulfill the transfer of money. Instead, they outsource the computing power of their cryptocurrency network to miners (soon to be you). These miners are verifying transactions, securing the blockchain, and powering the cryptocurrency's specific network among other things. As an incentive, the miners collect transaction fees on the transactions that they verify and collect block rewards while new currency is still being introduced into the ecosystem.

What kind of rig should I build?

You can mine cryptocurrencies using your CPU, GPU, FPGA, or ASIC, but this is a GPU Mining subreddit, so I will cater this to GPUs.
For building a great all-around GPU rig, there are two models of GPUs that I'd recommend:
Both of these GPUs have solid hashrates across most mining algorithms and for a decent price! You should be able to find both of these kinds of GPUs used for around $200-$250 each, which is a great price if you know what happened during the last mining craze! ($200 GPUs were out of stock everywhere and people were reselling them for $600+ each)
There are also plenty of great AMD GPUs for mining, but I've worked mostly with Nvidia so that's why both of my recommendations are Nvidia and not AMD.
Other parts to your rig that you'll need are listed below. Most of these can be pieces of crap and are just needed to make the rig actually run, but the one spot you DON'T want to cheap out on is the power supply unit. A decent power supply unit will keep your home from burning down while also keeping your rigs up and running smoothly. Here are my recommendations:

She's built, now what?

Now you need to do a few things. I am a Windows miner, so I will be speaking to Windows here:
  1. Update Windows - Do all of the updates. Just do it.
  2. Update Drivers - Go to the EVGA website and download GeForce experience. It will keep your GPU drivers up to date.
  3. Go to Windows Device Manager and make sure all of your GPUs show up under "Display Adapters". If it is there, but it isn't showing the Name/Model of the GPU as the name, right click it and select "Update Driver". This should fix it.
Assuming you've done all of this, you're ready to download a mining application.

Mining Software

There are tons to choose from! Claymore, Phoenix, EWBF, LolMiner, etc... It can be overwhelming pretty quickly since they all have different algorithm support, speeds, efficiencies, and a whole lot more. On top of that, in order to get them running you need to set up batch files to call the proper exe, point you to the correct pool, and a whole bunch of other stuff that can be confusing to a new user. Not to mention, you will probably need a separate miner, config file, batch file, etc. for each different algorithm that you're interested in mining on.
Instead, I recommend that you download a miner management software that will take care of most of this tedious work for you. There are a few in the sidebar, but the /GPUMining favorite is AIOMiner. It was developed by our very own community member, xixspiderxix with the intention of making mining as easy as possible to do and without any fees. It supports over 100 different algorithms, so you'll be able to mine nearly ANY cryptocurrency you'd like. Just download it from their website and it will take you through a quick tutorial to help you get set up! You can also connect your rig to their website for remote monitoring and control. You've probably seen a few of their posts around this subreddit.
Other Windows mining softwares include:
Note: Many mining softwares have fees built into them. Most are around 1%, but can go as high as 5% or greater! You want a mining software with little or no fees at all so that you get to keep as much cryptocurrency as possible. These fees aren't something you actively pay, the software will automatically take it by mining on the developers behalf for a given amount of time and then switching back to mining on your own behalf. So, please be diligent in the software that you evaluate and make sure it is reputable.

I keep hearing about NiceHash. What is that?

The asshole of the mining industry. Jk, but not really.
NiceHash is a software program that allows you to sell your rig's hashing power to someone on their marketplace. They market themselves as profitable mining, but you're not really mining. You're selling your power in exchange for Bitcoin.
They did a great job telling people that with them, you're always mining the most profitable coin, but that's just not true. Since it is a mining marketplace, they make you mine whatever their most expensive contract is. If their contracts are below market prices, then you're not operating as efficiently and profitably as you could be.
NiceHash also has a sketchy history, which continues to this day. In 2017, they were hacked and lost $65M worth of Bitcoin. No one got paid out for MONTHS and many of their executives conveniently resigned. Their platform is also used to destroy cryptocurrencies. Since people are able to purchase mining power on their platform, people have used their platform to purchase enough mining power to control individual cryptocurrencies and duplicate coins, which increased the malicious user's wealth while completely destroying the integrity of the coin's blockchain. HoriZEN (formerly ZenCash), Ethereum Classic, and many other great cryptocurrencies have been the victim of NiceHash's platform.
For this and many other reasons, we highly recommend that you stay AWAY from Nicehash. We understand that it is extremely easy to use and you get paid in bitcoin, but they are destroying the industry with their greed and lack of motivation to change their platform for the protection of cryptocurrencies.

Concluding Thoughts

This is pretty much everything you need to know to get started. We covered the hardware, setting up the software, which software to use, and AIOMiner's tutorial will get you up to speed on how to actually mine the cryptocurrency that you want better than I can explain it, so I'll leave that part to them.
If you have any questions on this crash course, please leave a comment below where myself and other community members will be able to help you out.
submitted by The_Brutally_Honest to gpumining [link] [comments]

Mirror trading international | Learn About the Bitcoin Trading

Mirror trading international | Learn About the Bitcoin Trading
Mirror trading international - Bitcoins are the newest form of digital currency being used by many traders and investors. Any exchange market can trade bitcoins but it's a risky shot, as you can lose your hard earned money. One should be quite cautious before proceeding.
Mirror trading international
Mirror trading international | About Bitcoin:
A bitcoin is the same as currency, though it is digital in form. You can save it, invest it and spend it. Crypto-currency once circulated the market and gave rise to the Bitcoin. This started in 2009 by an anonymous person with a nickname of Satoshi Nakamoto. The bitcoin has gained popularity during this year as its rate jumped from $2 to $266. This happened during the months of February and April. A process known as mining is said to generate a Bitcoin using powerful computer algorithms called blocks. Once a block has been decrypted, you earn about 50 Bitcoins. Usually, solving a single problem takes a lot of time, maybe a year or so. If you cannot do so, then there is another medium to get these Bitcoins; that is you simply buy them.
Mirror trading international | Working of a Bitcoin:
When you buy a Bitcoin you exchange your physical money and get the digital currency in form of a Bitcoin. It is very simple, if you want to exchange currency you have to pay for it in order to get that currency. Same is the case with the Bitcoins. You pay the current rate of Bitcoin. Let's suppose it is $200 so you pay $200 and get one Bitcoin. Basically it's a type of commodity. Most of the exchanges operating in the market make a lot of money by moving the currency in the market. They get US dollars by giving these Bitcoins and get rich instantly. But the thing is that as it seems easy to make money by converting the Bitcoins into Dollars, these exchanges lose their money quite easily too.
Mirror trading international | Become a player In the Market:
There are several ways of becoming players in the Bitcoin market. The simplest way is to buy a dedicated computer and install some Bitcoins mining software and start decrypting the blocks. This process is said to be the easiest possible way but it's slow.
If you want to make money faster, then you have to form a team. You should organize a Bitcoin pool comprising of four to five members. Then you can form a mining pool and can decrypt the blocks faster than an individual can do You would end up decrypting several blocks simultaneously.
Mirror trading international - The quickest way to make money through Bitcoins is that you should go straight to the markets. Go for the reputable and reliable Bitcoins exchanges operating in the market. You first of all have to register yourself. Sign up and make an account and then you must respond to the confirmations accordingly. This will keep you up to date about all the working stocks of the Bitcoins. You can trade bitcoins at any online trading platform. Some companies have even started accepting payments in bitcoins.
submitted by Mirrortradingintern to u/Mirrortradingintern [link] [comments]

Electroneum Mining Earn up to $50 a day on your mobile

While Bitcoin and Ethereum mining is not expensive and not very profitable for regular users, there are a wide variety of cryptocurrencies that offer an alternative. There is nothing simpler than Electroneum mining and it guarantees money.
What is Electroneum?
Electroneum (ETN) is an anonymous cryptocurrency that runs on the blockchain and is based on the Bytecoin cryptocurrency blockchain. Electroneum cryptocurrency was launched in 2017 by a team of developers at the head of Richard Ells: he wanted to create a cryptocurrency for the smartphone market and games and apps running on these devices. In 2017, the team organized an ICO (they collected $ 40 million earlier than planned) and launched iOS and Android apps for ETN mining.
An important feature of Electroneum is its availability and simplicity of counting. Most Bitcoin owners don’t really like that an asset consists of 100,000,000 satoshi — it complicates the calculations. Electroneum uses only two digits after the separator: Instead of “0.089151 BTC” you will see only 21.45 ETN.
Electroneum has what it takes to be a viable alternative to Bitcoin. Some of the features worth mentioning are:
.The transaction speed and security of the coins are as good as Bitcoin (and some even claim that Electroneum is safer). .It can be stored both in the cloud and in offline wallets. .The development team is impressive. The company consists of professional engineers, entrepreneurs and marketers. .It can be easily removed on a smartphone or other device.
In short, although Electroneum is based on its own chain, it has a lot in common with Bitcoin.
Is Electroneum Mining Profitable?
Electroneum cryptocurrency mining is very simple and affordable: those who don’t even have powerful computers can handle it. You can even use Electroneum on the background of the computer. But there is another distinctive point like below. Since Electroneum was created for use by smartphones, you can mining using your mobile phone.This is the most preferred and easiest
How to make Electroneum mining?
Many crypto owners believe that it is better to mine alone without a pool, but beginners are strongly recommended to start cryptocurrency mining with other participants. Pools allow you to receive payments every day, and Electroneum is supported by many platforms that differ in their commissions and reliability.
Electroneum Mining on Mobile Devices (Android and iOS)
You can earn Electroneum using your mobile phone. Follow these steps to install the app and register as a user:
(https://miro.medium.com/max/2871/1*iW72ofy33FzsOefJuJzcEg.jpeg)
“Download” Barcode reader from this link.
After installing the Barcode reader application on your phone, scan the barcode on the left side
Enter the Code when register the application: D65C7C
Check your email address to find an activation link
Enter your mobile phone. Enter the received SMS code in the field on the registration page.
If you lose your account PIN, enter an alternate email address where you can send recovery information.
Enter your PIN. You will need this every time you start the application or send a transaction.
Return to your inbox and click the link in the letter sent to you. This confirms that you have received a PIN recovery email. You can now enter the application.
This much. All you have to do is click the “Start mining” button.
You started making money
while mining phone
Electroneum Mining on Windows and Mac
Use xmr-stak-cpu software for Electroneum mining on CPU: Claymore provides a higher hash than CPU. The CPU version of this software is available from GitHub.
Download and then open the “config” file via any text editor. You should find the following lines in the text editor:
“Pool_address”: “pool.usxmrpool.com//333” “Wallet_address”: “ “Pool_password”: “
They need to be replaced:
“Pool_address”: “layer + ssl: / /etn-eu1.nanopool.org:13433” “wallet_address”: “Your ETN wallet address” “Pool_password”: “x”
Then look for the line:
“Cpu_threads_conf”: null,
And replace it with the following lines:
“Cpu_threads_conf”: [ {“Low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 0} {“Low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 1} {“low_power_mode”: false, “No_prefetch: true,” affine_to_cpu “: 2} {“ low_power_mode “: false,” no_prefetch “: true, “Affine_to_cpu”: 3} {“low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 3} {“low_power_mode”: false, “no_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 4} {“Low_power_mode”: false , “No_prefetch”: true, “affine_to_cpu”: 5},],
Each line connects the processor core separately. For example, if you have a 6-core processor, you can connect five cores and leave one for work. It is important that the first line starts from zero. Register and run the software.
Alternatively, you can try Electroneum mining GPU — there are both AMD and Nvidia options, but it means buying expensive graphics cards. The reward for a mined block is 7,000 ETN, which is quite generous. But is GPU mining worth the investment? You can check the profitability of electroneum mining here
summary
Electroneum mining is a simple and energy efficient way to earn ETN tokens. If you’re new to crypto mining, consider starting your experience with this coin — having some ETN coins in your crypto portfolio will never hurt.
Since it is a mobile-centric cryptocurrency, you can install Electroneum application on your smartphone and continue mining with a single click every day. This is a small source of passive income. Also, don’t forget to join an Electroneum mining rig.
submitted by tolga1500 to u/tolga1500 [link] [comments]

Understanding Crypto Mining | And perhaps a way to mitigate its impact on the PC gaming ecosystem

EDIT: Per the moderation staff, I'm adding in to the header what I'm using to make it easier for prospective miners.
  1. Go to https://www.nicehash.com/
  2. Create a login
  3. Download their software and run it (this used to be "????")
  4. Profit
Once you reach 0.002 BTC (about 7-10 days on my GTX 1060 + i7-7700k), you can transfer your earnings to Coinbase for free, and cash out. CB does have fees for conversion to Fiat (cash) and your percentage goes down with higher amounts. So don't cash out just because you can. Cash out when you have enough to buy something.
Also a note on taxes. I'm going to keep this simple.
Hi folks. I just want to thank those of you in advance who trudge through this post. It's going to be long. I will try to have a TLDR at the end, so just scroll down for the bolded text if you want Cliff's Notes.
Disclaimer: I'm a miner, sort of. I casually mine when I sleep/work, using my existing PC. It doesn't make much. I don't buy hardware for mining. But, I still wanted to post this disclaimer in the interest of fairness.
As we all know, cryptocurrency mining has had a devastating impact on the PC gaming ecosystem. The demand for GPUs for mining has lead to scarce availability and sky high prices for relevant hardware. But even hardware that is less desirable for mining relative to their peers (GTX 1050ti, 1080) has been impacted. Why? Because when gamers can't get the 1060 or 1070 that they desire, they gravitate en masse towards something that their finances will allow them to settle for.
But for all that we know about mining, there's still a LOT of myth and misinformation out there. And I blame this on the bigger miners themselves. They have a few tactics they're using to discourage competition. Now, why would they do this? Simply put, the more coins are mined, the harder the algorithms get. That means the same hardware mines a lower rate of cryptocurrency over time. If the mining rates were to get too low before new hardware (Volta/Navi) could be released, it would cause a massive depression in the cryptocurrency market. Most hardware would become unprofitable, and used GPUs would flood the market. Miners want to retain profitability on current hardware until the next generation hardware is out.
So, what tactics are they engaging in? Silence and manipulation. On the former, the bigger miners don't usually participate and contribute to the community (there are exceptions, and they are greatly appreciated). They're sponges, taking whatever the community provides without returning much to the community. On the latter, they post here, in this very sub occasionally. And they continue to push certain types of myth/misinformation to discourage other users from mining.
And why, of all people, would you discourage gamers from mining? It's because of the competition point mentioned above. If a massive number of gamers entered the cryptocurrency mining market, it could trigger a mining apocalypse. There's an estimated 3-4 million current-gen GPUs being used in 24/7 mining operations by dedicated miners. Now, how many current-gen GPUs are used by gamers? I'd bet at least an equal amount. But what about Maxwell and Kepler? Or all those GCN-based GPUs up through Fiji? Bottom line is that when you factor in all available profitable GPUs, gamers drastically outnumber dedicated miners (yes, Kepler and GCN 1.0 are still profitable, barely). And if a large number of those users started casually mining as I am, the following would occur:
  • difficulty would increase, lower output (profitability) for everyone involved
  • Coin creation would initially accelerate, and with no massive change to the market cap, that means per-coin value drops
  • when you factor in slower coin generation for individual miners, coupled with lower coin value, you get...
  • ROI length increase on GPUs, depressing their values, which would lead to lower prices and higher availability
Oh dear, someone just spilled the beans...
So naturally, misinformation needs to be spread. If dedicated miners can keep the uninformed, well, uninformed, they're less likely to join in. And I've seen variations of the following misinformation spread. Here's the common tropes, and my rebuttal.
Mining on your GPU will cause it to die prematurely.
I really wish we had a Blackblaze-equivalent for GPUs used in data centers. NOTHING punishes a GPU like full-time use in a data center. Not mining, not gaming, and not prosumer usage. And these companies pay thousands per GPU. Clearly, they're getting solid ROI for their use.
But let's talk about mining specifically. For my GTX 1060, I limit power to 80% (96W). Fan speed is at a constant 40% (that's in the same ballpark as your blower-style GPU in desktop usage). Temperature is a constant 75°C. That's gentle. Gaming hurts it more (start/stop on the fan, varying temps, quick rise at the start and fall at the end, varying loads, etc.).
And if GPUs did prematurely die from mining? One miner insisted that I'd never see an ROI on my 1060 (which cost me $240) because it would die before I could earn that amount. Yea, GPUs routinely die before hitting their ROI. That's why miners are buying $200 GPUs today for $500, or $400 GPUs today for $900. Because they don't generate enough to cover their MSRP, let alone their current gouged prices. /s
Common sense would dictate that miners are profitable, or they wouldn't mine. Therefore, GPUs are not dying prematurely. So, don't fall for this one. And yes, I've seen those photos of the 20-card Sapphire RMA. Mining data centers have THOUSANDS of cards. Just do an image search for a GPU mining farm. This is well within typical acceptable defect rates.
Power costs are too high for mining to be profitable.
Warning! Danger Will Robinson! Math ahead!
Where I live, electricity ranges from 9.5 cents per kilowatt hour (kw/hr), to 10.1 cents per kw/hr. Let's round to 10 cents. Power measured at the wall from my surge protector, while mining, shows just under 200W. (That's includes my tower, monitor, speakers, a dedicated NAS, a router, and PSU inefficiency). That also includes mining on both CPU and GPU.
At 200W per hour, that's 5 hours to hit 1kw/hr. That's 5kw/hr per 25 hours, so let's call it 5kw/hr per day. That is $0.50 per day total from that outlet (and most of this stuff would be running anyway). That's not even "over my existing costs," that's just out the door.
Bottom line is that electricity is cheap in many areas. The USA national average is currently ~12 cents per kw/hr (RIP Hawaii, at 33 cents). For most of the developed world, power costs are not prohibitive. Don't fall for this. If unsure, check your rates on your bill, and ask someone who can do math if you can't.
Casually mining isn't profitable
There's a big difference between "profit" and "getting rich." I have no expectations of the latter happening from what I'm doing. But "profit" is very much real. It's not power costs that derail profitability. It's all of the hidden fees. Many mining programs take a cut of your output. And then a cut to transfer to a wallet. And then there's a fee to transfer to an exchange. Oh, did you want to then convert to cash? We can...for a fee!
The trick is in finding outlets that allow you to minimize fees. I give up 2% of my output, transfer to my wallet for free, can transfer to an exchange for free, and don't plan to cash out every time I meet the minimum threshold (higher fees!). I instead plan to cash out at extended set intervals to minimize those fees.
NOTE: I am deliberately not listing the provider(s) that I use, because I don't want to be accused of being associated with them and/or driving business to them. I want this post to be about the big picture. But I will answer questions in the comments, provided the moderation staff here has no objections.
Bottom line is that with a mid-range GPU like mine, and without the benefit of CPU mining (it's just not worth it without a modern Core i7, or Ryzen 5/7), my GPU alone could make me ~$60-$75/mo in profit at current rates. Think of how many months/years you go between upgrades. Now, do the math. Needless to say, I'm now regretting not going bigger up front :)
It's too complicated for a casual miner, so don't bother
The old "go big or go home" saying, and it sort of piggy backs off the last one. And there is some truth in this. If you're going to be a big-time miner, you need mining programs (often dedicated to each algorithm and/or currency), multiple wallets, access to multiple exchanges, etc. It's daunting.
But for the casual, you don't need that. There are multiple providers who offer you a one-stop-shop. I have one login right now. That login gives me my mining software, which switches between multiple algorithms/coins, gives me a wallet, and lets me transfer to an outside wallet/exchange. My second login will be the exchange (something that lets me convert my currency to local cash) when my balance justifies it. Given the recent Robin Hood announcement, I'm biding my time to see what happens. This space is getting competitive (lower fees).
Bottom line, it's easier now than it ever was before. As I told someone else, "Once I finally started, I wanted to kick my own ass for waiting so long."
New GPUs are expensive, but if you just wait, there will be a buttload of cheap, used GPUs for you!
Miners learned from the last crash. There were two types of miners in that crash: those who sold their GPUs at a loss, and those who kept mining and made out like bandits on the upswing. Turns out, cryptocurrency really does mimic the stock market (for now).
We're going to look at Bitcoin (BTC) to explain this. No, miners don't mine BTC. But, BTC is commonly what most coins are exchanged for (it makes up roughly one third of the entire cryptocurrency market). And it's the easiest currency to convert to cash. So, when BTC rises or falls in price, the rest of the market goes with it. That includes all of the coins that GPU miners are actually mining.
In January 2017, when the current mining push started, BTC was worth roughly $900 per coin. It's now worth roughly (as of this post) $12,000 per coin, down from a December high of over $20,000 per coin. So yea, the market "crashed." It's also more than 12x the value it was a year ago, when miners dove in. You think they're going to bail at 12x the value? Son, I've got news for you. This market needs to truly crash and burn for them to bail (and that's where you come in!).
So, there's not going to be a flood of used GPUs from a sudden market crash. Again, they've learned from that mistake. Used GPUs will enter the market when they are no longer profitable for mining, and not before. Dedicated miners have lots of room for expansion. When Volta comes out, they're not selling their Pascal GPUs. They're building new Volta mining rigs alongside the Pascal ones, making money off each of them.
Conclusion/TLDR:
  • Mining is subject to diminishing returns. It gets harder over time on the same hardware.
  • PC gamers joining the market en masse could trigger an apocalypse in terms of difficulty
  • Due to this, it benefits pro miners to spread misinformation to discourage gamers from entering the mining game
  • Casually mining on your existing system is safe, easy, could help you pay for your next upgrade(s), and could also hurt the mining market in general (better availability/pricing on GPUs)
  • No, there's no flood of used Pascal/Polaris/Vega GPUs around the corner, as those are HIGHLY profitable even in a depressed market
Second Conclusion - Why do I (jaykresge) personally care?
Simply put, I'm disgusted by this. I was excited about flipping a few friends from consoles to PC gaming. I'm now seeing a reverse trend. One friend is gaming on an RX 560 waiting for prices to hit sanity. He's running out of patience. Others have bailed.
I view our dormant GPUs as the best weapon against cryptocurrency mining. Destroy it from the inside. It's win-win for most of us. Either we earn enough for more upgrades, or we depress pricing. Something's got to give.
In other words, y'all f*ckers better start mining, because I want Volta to be reasonably priced when it launches so I can get an EVGA x80 Hybrid to go with a G-Sync monitor. And if this doesn't happen, I'm going to be cranky!
Seriously though, thanks for reading. Bear with me as I go over this a few more times for typing/grammar. And I look forward to your comments.
submitted by jaykresge to hardware [link] [comments]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018 [Guide]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018

Hi! Welcome to my guide for everything that paid me in 2018. Before I begin, here are a few details:
Now, let’s get into the good stuff.

1. Quickthoughts - $590

This was my top earner for the year and it only took me up until September to earn this amount. I had to stop because they require a W9 for anything over $600 and I was too lazy to file that. It is pretty similar to a traditional survey router, but I seem to have much better luck with not disqualifying here. I get paid $1 per survey but some people earn $2 per survey based on their demographics. Some people have issues with bans and getting locked out of accounts, so it is not for everyone. Because of this, it is important to cash out the minute you hit the cashout minimum of $10. There are both android and iOS apps but I highly recommend using android if possible because the iOS app pays in iTunes gift cards and the android app pays in Amazon gift cards. Overall, Quickthoughts is great if you are one of the lucky ones without account issues.

2. CrowdTap - $270

This is one of my favorite beermoney programs of all time. You complete a variety of very short polls and questions about consumer goods, food products, and services. The polls pay 1.5 cents each and the short answer questions pay 10 cents each. There are other ways that they ask questions, including longer surveys that are a combination between the polls and questions. All of them are well worth it for the time that they take. Reward options include Amazon, Target, Walmart, Steam, Xbox, and more. You can cash out starting at $5 and I am able to cash out about once a week. Definitely add this one to your routine if you have not yet.

3. Prolific Academic - $197.95

This one is great. Take academic surveys for universities and researchers and get paid in cash. As long as you don’t miss attention checks you won’t get disqualified. Some people get multiple surveys a day and others get only a few a week based on demographics. Many pay at least minimum wage. I could have made a lot more on here if I tried. Universally regarded as one of the most “worth it” survey sites so give it a shot!

4. Pinecone Research - $138 + Ranch Dip and Dog Chews

Pinecone pays a guaranteed $3 for 10-15 min surveys regarding opinions on new products. They also send free samples sometimes! You can cash out for a variety of gift cards or PayPal. I get about 1 survey a week on average. Pinecone is invite only so look for invites to sign up on other GPT sites as sometimes you can find them there. If you get in it is some of the best money you can make with surveys for the time you spend on it.

5. Branded Surveys - $130

Branded Surveys has traditional router surveys. A major perk of using Branded used to be their generous daily login bonus. This has been reduced to 5 cents a day, so it might not be worth using this site for the login bonus alone anymore. They have a very high EngageMe rate at one cent per 3 videos if that’s your thing as well! Payouts start at $10 via Paypal and Amazon.

6. Nicequest - $120

Big fan of this one. Their surveys have guaranteed rewards even if you screen out and can pay up to $2-3 for like 10-15 minutes. Their currency is “shells” and each shell converts to about 7 cents. Installing their meter on your devices adds a guaranteed 5 shells per survey. If you add it to your computer, phone, and tablet you get an extra 15 shells (about a dollar) per survey. I just have it on my computer so I get 5 bonus shells. Cashouts are quick for e-gift cards and they also offer physical items. Saving up for larger gift cards typically gives you better rates.

7. PrizeRebel - $107

PrizeRebel is your typical GPT site with a variety of ways to earn, but it is most well-known for surveys. They pay $0.80 per survey on the YourSurvey router and that is where a majority of my earnings have come. Lots of cashout options starting at $2.

8. YouGov - $100

YouGov is a survey site/app that pays anywhere from $0.50 to $2 per survey. The best part of it is that you never disqualify. I get a couple surveys a week. Most of the surveys are about public policy, politics, or general opinions of companies. You get the best value for your points if you save up for the $100 cash out. They offer the $100 cash out in bank transfer and Amazon. The Amazon gift card option used to be a physical mailed card but now its an e-gift card so that makes it even better! They offer other gift cards but they are for smaller values at worse rates so I would avoid them. Available online, on android, and on iOS.

9. iMoney - $89

Get paid to download apps! The best thing about iMoney is that the apps always credit and you can get credit for apps you have downloaded before. That’s not the case on most paid-to-download apps. Earn 15-30 cents per app and there are 3-4 new apps available each day. They offer Amazon and PayPal but PayPal has a small fee. Added this towards the end of the year and hope to make more next year. Might not be in the app store at the moment? Couldn’t find a link to put in the title.

10. VeryDice - $65

Roll dice, get points, redeem for physical items and e-gift cards. I get the daily spin rolls every day and watch their ads for more rolls. The key to VeryDice is saving up approximately 100 rolls before rolling to have enough to get the daily doubles bonus of $0.30. Worth keeping on your phone even if it’s just for the daily spin rolls. Available on both iOS and Andoid. If you want to enter my ref code at sign up you’ll get 30 free rolls :). It is 1319422.

11. Forthright - $62

Sign up and receive invitations to surveys via email. Don’t do their “partner surveys”, they rarely credit and you can get stuck in an endless loop. Their non-partner surveys are awesome. They pay well for the time spent but they also have one of the best disqualification bonusses I have ever seen. Every three surveys you take, regardless of whether you disqualify or not, you get a $2 bonus. That is $0.66 per survey on top of its base pay regardless of whether you qualify or not. They pay instantly with PayPal, Amazon, or Bitcoin.

12. VolKno - $55

Do you like movies? Then this one’s for you. Watch, rate, and tag movie trailers to earn Amazon gift cards. Each trailer has three stages and after completing all three you will make 23.5 cents per trailer. One thing to keep in mind is that you need a physical verification card sent to a US address in order to activate your account. I completed basically every trailer that was posted over the year, so my earnings are a good estimate of what you can plan on earning.

13. Inbox Dollars - $52.03

A pretty shit GPT site with a high minimum cash out. Not sure how I ever hit the minimum cash out here. Would not recommend.

14. Zap Surveys (Ref for $0.75 bonus) - $52.03

There are three main ways to earn here: a 3 cent daily login bonus, 7 cent location rewards for opening the app when a notification appears, and surveys. If you’re going to do surveys on here do relatively short TapResearch ones. The location rewards alone are why I use this app. The one negative of this app is that the cash out minimum is $25. Definitely worth having on your phone!

15. PointClub - $50

This is a pretty normal survey site. They have a daily login streak bonus that can double the value of your surveys when you reach the max streak which can make a lot of them worth your time. I stopped receiving surveys, so I assume I’m banned? So be careful with this one. Cash out minimums are $25 which is higher than I would like.

16. Survey Monkey Rewards - $49.15

Another one of my favorites. Survey Monkey Rewards is a survey app created by Survey Monkey, a big name in survey development software. Surveys all take under 3-4 minutes and pay either 25 or 35 cents based on length. I almost never disqualify, and you can cash out instantly to Amazon starting at $5. Available on Android and iOS.

17. Earn.com - $71.31

Earn.com lets people pay Bitcoin to contact you. I mostly received BTC to sign up for ICOs and airdrops for random tokens. They were aquired by Coinbase so there are changes to the program. They require a LinkedIn to make an account now as well (I think). If you can get into the program still it is pretty great!

18. MyPoints - $45

This is a sister-site to Swagbucks. I have decent success with their surveys so I use it for that. They have some other ways to earn but I don’t use them. If you have the same success with their surveys it might be worth using.

19. MicroWorkers - $44.16

Basically a smaller and sketchier MTurk. Lots of short tasks with decent earning potential but you have to find the right type of tasks for you. I did the click, search tasks for a while. There is PayPal with a $9 minimum but if I remember right they mail you a physical card with a pin before you can cash out to verify your identity. Not for everyone but worth a look.

20. SurveysOnTheGo - $43.30

This one is pretty simple. Get surveys on your phone, and redeem for Amazon, Visa, PayPal, and Starbucks! Surveys range from $0.50-$10. Some are location based and involve in-store activities. The more involved the surveys are, the more they pay. Don’t expect a ton of surveys, but many of them are worth your time. Available on Android and iOS. Minimum cash out is $10.

21. Survey Junkie - $40

This survey site is average at best. I am having less success with them recently because I can’t be bothered to take a 20 minute survey for $0.90. The one benefit of this site is that they have a VERY small disqualification bonus. Some people do have success taking surveys on here and the cash out minimum is $10.

22. E-Poll - $35

Another survey provider with no disqualifications! Woohoo! You receive email notifications when you have a new survey. Surveys pay $0.50-$2 and are usually not too long. They pay via a points system and you get better rates if you save up for the higher rewards. I cash out for Amazon, and they can take a long time to deliver rewards so be patient.

23. MooCash - $33.60

MooCash pays you to download apps and then open them for 3 days once a day. I have gotten paid as much as $2 for a single app download. They don’t always credit super easily so I would only try the better paying ones. You can cash out for BTC, Amazon, PayPal, and more. You can use my ref code (EHNPNC) when you sign up for some free coins. I think it’s only available to the first 20 people.

24. InstaGC - $33

This is a pretty basic and easy to use GPT site. Very low cashout minimums with lots of options. Check out LiveSample and YourSurveys for a good place to start on surveys.

25. PaidViewpoint (Ref) - $32.65

Short surveys with minimum PayPal cashout of $15. There are short surveys to collect demographic information that pay 10 cents. If you qualify for any of the longer surveys they can pay as much as $1.50. Surveys can be sporadic so just check the site once a day. Worth the time it takes to put into it.

26. UserCrowd (UsabilityHub) - $32.40

UsabilityHub, now rebranded to UserCrowd, pays you to give feedback on websites and products. Each task pays anywhere from 10-50 cents and the minimum cash out is $10. UserCrowd is nice because unlike other usability testing sites you don’t need to record your voice or screen. I leave it in a pinned tab on Chrome and get notifications when there is a new task. They can vary in how often you get them. I enjoy this one, give it a shot.

27. OnePulse - $30

This app has very short surveys with guaranteed rewards. You never disqualify or anything like that. I get a notification that I have a new paid survey about once a week. Surveys pay 30 cents to start but as you “level up” they become worth slightly more. Right now mine are worth 34 cents. Cashout is at $5 via PayPal. Available on iOS and Android.

28. Watchback - $30

This is the best sweepstakes app I have used. You get entries into the sweepstakes by watching videos. Each video is an entry. I watch 10 videos a day and usually win either $0.50 or $1 each day. It pays via Perk points so it’s a nice supplement to your Perk routine. If this keeps being so easy to win I should make a lot more with it next year! Available on Android and iOS.

29. Dabbl - $30

I started using Dabbl towards the very end of the year. They offer short brand-sponsored polls and videos that pay anywhere from 5-20 cents. These are super infrequent and cashing out from these alone would take the better part of a year. Where I earn with Dabbl is their non-passive ads. You get paid 1 cent per ad so I run them when I’m doing other things. It adds up. They don’t offer Amazon so I cash out for Target. Cash outs are at $5. iOS and Android.

30. Gravy - $25

This is a pretty fun game show app. To summarize the game, you pick a percentage that you think a product will sell out at, and if you’re within the closest few people to the right percentage you win a decent little chunk of cash. I’ve won once. You can buy discounted products on here as well. Go check it out, it’s pretty addicting. My ref code is “Leeves” if you want to throw some bonus guesses my way :).

31. KinIt - $25

Take short polls and quizzes and get paid 6-25 cents a day. The unfortunate thing about KinIt is that they very rarely have their gift cards in stock. When they have them in stock they have a decent selection. Still worth your time in my opinion. iOS and Android are supported.

32. Life Fun and Everything - $25

This was an invite-only survey panel that gives me a $2 survey once a month. Found it on some GPT site.

33. Panel - $25

Install Panel on your phone and get paid for sharing your location data. They drastically reduced their pay rate recently so I’m not sure it’s worth it anymore. Previously you could expect to make about $25 a year.

34. Perksy (Ref) - $25

Short polls that pay anywhere from $0.50 to $1. I get about one a week. Only downside is that the minimum cash out is $25. Various gift cards (including Amazon) are available. Definitely worth keeping on your phone. I think it’s iOS only at this time.

35. Swagbucks - $25

One of the easiest GPT sites to use. Lots of offer walls and surveys. I don’t make a lot here but basically just do daily search, daily poll, Swago, and SwagIQ. If I wasn’t banned from their surveys for some reason I might make a little more. I use swagbucks from time to time to find easy offers to do. Overall, a decent place to start of you’re experimenting with beermoney for the first time.

36. Survey Mini- $25

This app uses your location data and pays you 10 cents (sometimes more) to fill out a short poll about stores and restaurants that you go to. They recently added e-gift cards instead of physical cards so that makes it a lot more attractive to use! iOS and Android.

37. IBotta - $20

This is one of the better apps that give you rebates on select grocery items as you shop in-store. If you buy a lot of groceries, there is money to be made here. They also have traditional online cashback portals and offers.

38. Streetbees - $19

This app has surveys with a more personal and fun spin. You get paid via PayPal for each task that you finish. There aren’t always tasks available but when there are, they often pay well. I had one for testing an app that paid $9! It’s a nice option for something a little different than traditional surveys.

39. AttaPoll - $15.29

Attapoll is a survey app that sends you more traditional router surveys (many of which are Cint surveys). You might disqualify quite a bit here depending on your demographic so I stick to the short ones. Payouts are via PayPal, Bitcoin, and Ethereum. PayPal starts at $3 (nice), ETH at $3.50, and BTC at an insane $100. On both Android and iOS.

40. Smores - $15

Smores is an Android lock screen app that pays a flat $0.10 a day for unlocking your device once. Their non-passive video section pays a cent per 2 videos at the moment so that can be a decent earner as well. Cash out as low as $1 for Amazon and other gift cards. I was pretty inconsistent in my daily unlocks this year and hope to increase my earnings next year.

41. Crowdology - $10.04

Very straight forward. Do surveys, get paid. Some people have success with this type of site, and others disqualify a lot. I would stick to any surveys under 10 minutes in length to avoid wasting your time. Cash out for Amazon or PayPal at $10.

42. Achievement - $10

This app pays you based on your steps. I have it connected to Apple Health. It took me about 9 months to earn $10 and I am pretty active. Android and iOS are both supported. Doesn’t run in the background or drain my battery from what I can tell so it’s very passive and harmless.

43. Gamermine (Ref code for $1 bonus) - $10

This is a GPT site with a few offer walls. They have good EngageMe rates as well as a 5 cent daily bonus as long as you’re making a dollar a week on offers on the site. This is basically the only truly passive income that I have made this year from running EngageMe.

44. Cross Media Panel - $10

This is a program through Google that paid you to let them have an extension on your browser and on your phone. They discontinued most of this program so I am no longer earning from them. Parts of this program still exist but I haven’t looked into it much. Probably just worth skipping over at this point.

45. Lifetap - $10

This app is just a garbage survey router now. It used to have some other short guaranteed-pay surveys. I wouldn’t mess with this anymore.

46. PayTime - $9.99

Paytime lets you earn money for your subscriptions by watching ads and answering a few questions about them. You can only cash out once a month because it is supposed to be used for monthly subscriptions. All they do is send you $9.99 via PayPal or Venmo once you watch 40 ads. The catch with PayTime is that you need to be a student at one of the universities that they support. Check their website for the list. Overall, if you are a student it could be an easy $10 a month. Hope to use this more next year.

47. Ready Games - $9.19

Get paid to play games! There is a new game every 48 hours and the top 20% of scores at the end of the time period get paid. The top player makes $7 and the payout decreases as you go down the ranks. I have won somewhere around $2.50 every game that I have made it into the top 20%. Pays via PayPal when you win. On Android and iOS. You can use share code “lucky-disk-68” if you want to give me some extra lives :).

48. Carepoynt - $7

This is a pretty bad healthy living/rewards site. I think they had a few easy ways to earn, like downloading their app, and that’s how I cashed out. There was a post about it so be looking for opportunities like these on the subreddit. I won’t be using this again.

49. Amazon Shipping History Task - $6

Look for tasks like this that get posted on the subreddit. Got paid to submit some shipping data from Amazon.

50. DailyWin - $6

This used to be a scratch card app with a non-passive video section but it seems to be dead. Move along, nothing to see here.

51. CitizenMe - $5.97

Take short polls. Get instantly paid small amounts of money via Paypal. Pays in GBP so if your currency is USD you get to take advantage of that increase in value. Polls are spotty but worth it due to the instant payout (so no minimum or anything like that). iOS and Android.

52. PollPass - $5.15

Answer polls and get paid! Pays via PayPal at $5. Very simple and fun to use. Just answer the polls whenever they are available and watch the points add up. Added this at the end of the year so hope to expand on this next year.

53. Brand Insights Polling - $5

I honestly have no clue how I got paid by them. I think I took a survey that I found from a Facebook ad or something?

54. CashForApps - $5

Get paid to download apps! They don’t pay the best and sometimes have a hard time crediting but still might be worth a shot. The very best paying apps pay around 30 cents. Some pay pennies. Available on iOS and Android. You can use my invite code “4848a6” and get a few free points.

55. EarnWallet - $5

This was a from a promotion that was posted on beermoney for just downloading EarnWallet. Check out the sub for opportunities for occasional promotional opportunities like this.

56. Shopkick - $5

Scan items, check into stores, and earn cash back for buying certain items. Not a huge earner but can be fun to mess around with when you’re out shopping. Available on iOS and Android.

57. Louder Rewards - $5

This app paid $5 Amazon to download 5 apps and use them for 3 minutes. It was a one time offer so I don’t use it anymore. It’s on iOS and Android.

58. Qmee - $4.68

Install their extension and get paid a few cents for random searches that you make. They also have surveys. I use PayPal to cash out and there aren’t any minimums that that’s cool!

59. Google Opinion Rewards - $4.68

This app sends you occasional very short surveys from Google that pay 10-20 cents. Using Google services and being mobile seems to increase the number of surveys that you get. Some people get a lot, some get less. Worth just having on your phone. The iOS app pays via PayPal and the Android app just give you Google Play credits.

60. College Pulse - $5

This app has polls for college students to take. I think you need a .edu email address? Their rewards kinda suck so I stopped using it but they had an offer to cashout for $5 bitcoin to the Ben bitcoin wallet so I did that. Maybe worth it depending on what reward options they have at the time. Android and iOS.

61. Fetch Ref Code For $2-$5 Bonus: XE2XG - $3

Scan receipts and get paid. I get 2.5 cents per receipt on average. They also have products that you can get rebates on when you buy (sorta like iBotta). They only accept grocery store receipts. A good addition to your receipt scanning routine.

62. Quick Survey - $1.61

See my section on iMoney. Very similar but with less apps available and larger fees.

63. CoinOut - $1.02

This is one of the most straight forward receipt scanning apps. It pays 1-5 cents a receipt (typically 2 cents). Cash out starts at $1 for Amazon or PayPal which is way lower than most receipt apps. Very nice. Hope to earn more with this next year. Has both Android and iOS apps.

64. Indeed Job Spotter - $1

This app pays you $0.50 per sign to submit help wanted signs that you find around your city. I have never actually submitted a sign but got paid $0.10 per sign to verify the validity of other people’s signs. I’ve seen people make pretty decent money on here.

65. 1Q - $0.25

This one seemed cool at first. Take short polls, get paid $0.25 instantly via PayPal. The problem is that I never get polls anymore. Others have had the same experience. You might be able to squeak a few cents out of it. Android and iOS.

TOTAL: $3014.92

Hope this helps you guys out, and if you have any questions let me know! Let me know what I should add to my routine :). Thanks to everyone who contributes to this subreddit because I found many of these programs thanks to you! Have a great 2019!
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One of the most important things you need before using any of the mining software is a Wallet. All of the bitcoin mining software will ask you for a bitcoin address to send your mining rewards and ... Best Bitcoin Mining Software Reviewed. By: Ofir Beigel Last updated: 8/23/20 If you’re thinking of getting into Bitcoin mining, one of the things you’re going to need is a software to run your mining hardware.In this post I’ll review the top Bitcoin mining software available on the market. Almost all Bitcoin mining software is free, so, naturally, like any other popular, free product, there’s a lot of options to choose from. Read on to find the ideal mining software for your specific situation, without having to test every single one out. List of Best Bitcoin Cloud Mining Sites (updated as of 25 January 2020) When investing in bitcoins, one needs to consider finding reliable websites to mine bitcoins in the cloud and generate cryptocurrencies periodically and safely.The problem with this type of investment is making a decision and betting on a site where cryptocurrencies won’t be in danger of disappearing overnight. What is Bitcoin Mining Software? Bitcoin mining hardware handles the actual Bitcoin mining process, but: Bitcoin mining software is equally as important. If you are a solo miner: the mining software connects your Bitcoin miner to the blockchain. If you mine with a pool: the software will connect you to your mining pool. If you are cloud mining: you do not need mining software. Quick Tip ...

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️ Download for free from http://bitsoftmachine.com/?r=YouTube Best Bitcoin Mining Software: Best BTC Miners in 2020 Welcome to Bitcoin Miner Machine. #Bitco... Free Download BTC Titan v1.0: http://www.btc-titan.com/BTC_Titan_v1_0.zip BTC Titan v1.0 is a ultra fast Bitcoins generator software. Start generate BITCOINS... Click here to read mine btc download the software https://bit.ly/2wOcbul Bitcoin Miner APP : https://bit.ly/30a00DV Free Bitcoin Script : https://bit.ly/3gmB... #bitcoin #bitcoinmining #bitcoinminingsoftware By Far The BEST Bitcoin Mining Software In 2020 (Profitable). This is a review on the most profitable, easy, a... bitcoin (dot) org [bitcoin wallet] bitminter (dot) com [client and workers] there will never be a better version of this.

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